Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sci Rep. 2017 Jul 24;7(1):6300. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-06684-0.

Sustained efficacy of closed loop electrical stimulation for long-term treatment of absence epilepsy in rats.

Author information

1
MTA-SZTE 'Momentum' Oscillatory Neuronal Networks Research Group, Department of Physiology, University of Szeged, Szeged, H-6720, Hungary.
2
MTA-SZTE 'Momentum' Oscillatory Neuronal Networks Research Group, Department of Physiology, University of Szeged, Szeged, H-6720, Hungary. drberenyi@gmail.com.
3
New York University Neuroscience Institute, New York University, New York City, 10016, NY, USA. drberenyi@gmail.com.

Abstract

Closed-loop brain stimulation is a promising alternative to treat drug-resistant epilepsies. In contrast to optogenetic interventions, transcranial electrical stimulation (TES) does not require cellular modification of neurons to be effective, and it is less invasive compared to deep brain stimulation. Furthermore, on-demand TES of targeted brain regions allows the potential for normal function of these networks during interictal periods, a possibility that is eliminated by resective surgical treatment approaches. To further explore the translation of closed-loop TES for treatment of epilepsy, we show here for the first time that unsupervised closed-loop TES in rats can consistently interrupt seizures for 6 weeks and has the potential to control seizure activity up to 4 months (longest periods examined). On-demand TES significantly reduced the time spent in seizure and the individual seizure duration, although significantly higher seizure rate was observed during the treatment. The 6 week long stimulation had no residual adverse effects on the electrophysiologic characteristics of the brain after the termination of the treatment and did not induce glial remodelling in the brain. Our findings demonstrate the safety and effectiveness of minimally invasive, potentially lifelong TES treatment of epilepsy either alone or as a complement to drug treatments.

PMID:
28740261
PMCID:
PMC5524708
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-017-06684-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center