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Urology. 2017 Nov;109:216-221. doi: 10.1016/j.urology.2017.07.010. Epub 2017 Jul 19.

Safety and Feasibility of Direct Magnetic Resonance Imaging-guided Transperineal Prostate Biopsy Using a Novel Magnetic Resonance Imaging-safe Robotic Device.

Author information

1
The James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute and Department of Urology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
2
Siemens Healthcare, Baltimore, MD.
3
Department of Pathology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
4
Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
5
The James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute and Department of Urology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. Electronic address: mallaf@jhmi.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate safety and feasibility in a first-in-human trial of a direct magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided prostate biopsy using a novel robotic device.

METHODS:

MrBot is an MRI-safe robotic device constructed entirely with nonconductive, nonmetallic, and nonmagnetic materials and developed by our group. A safety and feasibility clinical trial was designed to assess the safety and feasibility of a direct MRI-guided biopsy with MrBot and to determine its targeting accuracy. Men with elevated prostate-specific antigen levels, prior negative prostate biopsies, and cancer-suspicious regions (CSRs) on MRI were enrolled in the study. Biopsies targeting CSRs, in addition to sextant locations, were performed.

RESULTS:

Five men underwent biopsy with MrBot. Two men required Foley catheter insertion after the procedure, with no other complications or adverse events. Even though this was not a study designed to detect prostate cancer, biopsies confirmed the presence of a clinically significant cancer in 2 patients. On a total of 30 biopsy sites, the robot achieved an MRI-based targeting accuracy of 2.55 mm and a precision of 1.59 mm normal to the needle, with no trajectory corrections and no unsuccessful attempts to target a site.

CONCLUSION:

Robot-assisted MRI-guided prostate biopsy appears safe and feasible. This study confirms that a clinically significant prostate cancer (≥5-mm radius, 0.5 cm3) depicted in MRI may be accurately targeted. Direct confirmation of needle placement in the CSR may present an advantage over fusion-based technology and gives more confidence in a negative biopsy result. Additional study is warranted to evaluate the efficacy of this approach.

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