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J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2017 Oct;75(10):2091.e1-2091.e10. doi: 10.1016/j.joms.2017.06.037. Epub 2017 Jun 30.

Senior Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Resident Confidence in Performing Invasive Temporomandibular Joint Procedures.

Author information

1
Resident, Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, College of Dentistry, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL. Electronic address: mmomin2@uic.edu.
2
Professor and Chairman, Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, College of Dentistry, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL.
3
Visiting Professor, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL; and Clinical Consultant, TMJ Concepts, Ventura, CA.
4
Resident, Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, College of Dentistry, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL.
5
Assistant Professor, Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, College of Dentistry, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; and Attending Physician, Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, and Division of Dentistry, Department of Surgery, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the level of confidence that senior-level oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) residents have in the management of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders, determine their exposure to various invasive TMJ procedures during training, and assess their confidence in performing those procedures on completion of residency.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

A questionnaire was designed, and a link to a University of Illinois at Chicago Qualtrics Survey platform (Qualtrics, Provo, UT) was e-mailed to all program directors at Commission on Dental Accreditation-accredited OMS training programs in the United States. The program directors were asked to forward the 20-multiple-choice question anonymous survey to their senior-level residents for completion. The survey included the program's demographic characteristics, resident's confidence in assessing and managing patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs), resident's experience performing various invasive TMJ procedures, and whether the resident believed he or she had received sufficient education and clinical experience in the management of TMJ disorders. The data were collected and summarized by use of a standard spreadsheet analysis, as well as appropriate descriptive and analytical statistical tests.

RESULTS:

The response rate was 28.0%. Of the 56 respondents, 52 (92.9%) reported having received instruction in nonsurgical management of TMDs. All respondents confirmed that invasive TMJ procedures were performed in their program. The most commonly performed procedure was TMJ arthrocentesis (mean rating, 3.11), followed by open TMJ surgery (mean rating, 2.82). The least-performed invasive surgical procedure was autogenous total TMJ replacement surgery (mean rating, 1.39). Eighty percent of residents reported being comfortable managing the TMD patient. The only procedure with which the respondents were highly confident was TMJ arthrocentesis (mean rating, 3.89).

CONCLUSIONS:

This study suggests that confidence levels in the management of the TMD patient are related directly to the invasive TMJ procedure experience obtained during residency. This finding may have implications on the practice patterns of OMS surgeons as it relates to access to care for the TMD patient.

PMID:
28734995
DOI:
10.1016/j.joms.2017.06.037
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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