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Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2017 Oct 3;79(Pt B):392-400. doi: 10.1016/j.pnpbp.2017.07.017. Epub 2017 Jul 20.

Role of orbitofrontal sulcogyral pattern on lifetime cannabis use and depressive symptoms.

Author information

1
Brain and Mental Health Laboratory, Monash Institute of Cognitive and Clinical Neurosciences, School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
2
School of Psychology, Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, Australia.
3
Melbourne Neuropsychiatry Centre, Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia; Orygen, The National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, Victoria, Australia; Orygen, Centre for Youth Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
4
Department of Psychiatry, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Hospital Clinic, IDIBAPS, CIBERSAM, Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
5
Department of Developmental Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
6
Department of Psychiatry, Amsterdam Institute for Addiction Research, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Arkin Mental Health Care, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
7
Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Hospital Clinic, IDIBAPS, CIBERSAM, Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
8
Melbourne Neuropsychiatry Centre, Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
9
Brain and Mental Health Laboratory, Monash Institute of Cognitive and Clinical Neurosciences, School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia; Melbourne Neuropsychiatry Centre, Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia; School of Psychological Sciences, Institute of Psychology, Health and Society, The University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. Electronic address: vlor@liv.ac.uk.

Abstract

Orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) sulcogyral patterns are stable morphological variations established early in life. They consist of three distinct pattern types, with Type III in particular being associated with poor regulatory control (e.g., high sensation seeking and negative emotionality, low constraint), which may confer risk for earlier onset of cannabis (CB) use and greater use in later life. The OFC sulcogyral pattern may therefore be a stable trait marker in understanding individual differences in substance-use vulnerability and associated affective disturbances in users. In a large multisite cross-sectional study, we compared OFC pattern type distribution between 128 healthy controls (HC) and 146 CB users. Within users (n=140), we explored the association between OFC pattern type and CB use level, and subsequently if level of CB use informed by OFC pattern type may mediate disturbances in affective tone, as indexed by depressive symptoms. While OFC pattern distribution did not distinguish between HC and CB groups, it informed greater lifetime use within users. Specifically, CB users with pattern Type III in the right OFC tended to use more CB over their lifetime, than did CB users with pattern Type I or II. Greater lifetime CB use was subsequently associated with higher depressive symptoms, such that it mediated an indirect association between right OFC pattern Type III and higher depressive symptoms. The present study provides evidence for neurobiological differences, specifically sulcogyral pattern of the OFC, to modulate level of CB use, which may subsequently influence the expression of depressive symptoms.

KEYWORDS:

Cannabis; Dependence; MRI; Orbitofrontal cortex; Sulcogyral pattern

PMID:
28734940
DOI:
10.1016/j.pnpbp.2017.07.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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