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Clin Biochem. 2017 Dec;50(18):1159-1163. doi: 10.1016/j.clinbiochem.2017.07.007. Epub 2017 Jul 20.

Results from 15years of quality surveillance for a National Indigenous Point-of-Care Testing Program for diabetes.

Author information

1
Flinders University International Centre for Point-of-Care Testing, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia. Electronic address: Mark.Shephard@flinders.edu.au.
2
Flinders University International Centre for Point-of-Care Testing, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia. Electronic address: Anne.Shephard@flinders.edu.au.
3
Flinders University International Centre for Point-of-Care Testing, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia. Electronic address: Bridgit.Mcateer@flinders.edu.au.
4
Flinders University International Centre for Point-of-Care Testing, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia. Electronic address: Tamika.Regnier@flinders.edu.au.
5
Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia Quality Assurance Programs Pty Ltd, Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: Kristina.Barancek@sa.gov.au.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Diabetes is a major health problem for Australia's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Point-of-care testing for haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) has been the cornerstone of a long-standing program (QAAMS) to manage glycaemic control in Indigenous people with diabetes and recently, to diagnose diabetes.

METHODS:

The QAAMS quality management framework includes monthly testing of quality control (QC) and external quality assurance (EQA) samples. Key performance indicators of quality include imprecision (coefficient of variation [CV%]) and percentage acceptable results. This paper reports on the past 15years of quality testing in QAAMS and examines the performance of HbA1c POC testing at the 6.5% cut-off recommended for diagnosis.

RESULTS:

The total number of HbA1c EQA results submitted from 2002 to 2016 was 29,093. The median imprecision for EQA testing by QAAMS device operators averaged 2.81% (SD 0.50; range 2.2 to 3.9%) from 2002 to 2016 and 2.44% (SD 0.22; range 2.2 to 2.9%) from 2009 to 2016. No significant difference was observed between the median imprecision achieved in QAAMS and by Australasian laboratories from 2002 to 2016 (p=0.05; two-tailed paired t-test) and from 2009 to 2016 (p=0.17; two-tailed paired t-test). For QC testing from 2009 to 2016, imprecision averaged 2.5% and 3.0% for the two levels of QC tested. Percentage acceptable results averaged 90% for QA testing from 2002 to 2016 and 96% for QC testing from 2009 to 2016. The DCA Vantage was able to measure a patient and an EQA sample with an HbA1c value close to 6.5% both accurately and precisely.

CONCLUSION:

HbA1c POC testing in QAAMS has remained analytically sound, matched the quality achieved by Australasian laboratories and met profession-derived analytical goals for 15years.

KEYWORDS:

Analytical quality; Diabetes; HbA1c; Indigenous health; Point-of-care testing

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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