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Pediatr Clin North Am. 2017 Aug;64(4):937-951. doi: 10.1016/j.pcl.2017.03.012.

Zika Virus Infection.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Box 800386, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0386, USA. Electronic address: ds3ru@virginia.edu.
2
Department of Pediatrics, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Box 800386, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0386, USA.

Abstract

In less than 2 years since entry into the Americas, we have witnessed the emergent spread of Zika virus into large subsets of immunologically naïve human populations and then encountered the devastating effects of microcephaly and brain anomalies that can arise from in utero infection with the virus. Diagnostic evaluation and management of affected infants continues to evolve as our understanding of Zika virus rapidly advances. The development of a safe and effective vaccine holds the potential to attenuate the spread of infection and limit the impact of congenital infection.

KEYWORDS:

Congenital; Microcephaly; Mosquito; Sexual transmission; Travel; Zika

PMID:
28734519
DOI:
10.1016/j.pcl.2017.03.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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