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Pediatr Clin North Am. 2017 Aug;64(4):785-798. doi: 10.1016/j.pcl.2017.03.008.

Neonatal and Perinatal Infections.

Author information

1
Peter Gilgan Centre for Research and Learning (PGCRL), Centre for Global Child Health, The Hospital for Sick Children, 686 Bay Street, 11th Floor, Suite 11.9805, Toronto, Ontario M5G 0A4, Canada.
2
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G1X8, Canada.
3
Peter Gilgan Centre for Research and Learning (PGCRL), Centre for Global Child Health, The Hospital for Sick Children, 686 Bay Street, 11th Floor, Suite 11.9805, Toronto, Ontario M5G 0A4, Canada; Centre for Excellence in Women and Child Health, Aga Khan University, Stadium Road, Karachi 74800, Pakistan. Electronic address: Zulfiqar.bhutta@sickkids.ca.

Abstract

Lack of success in achieving considerable reductions in neonatal mortality is a contributory factor in failing to achieve Millennium Development Goal 4.2.6 million neonates still die each year, with preterm birth and infections the two leading causes. Maternal infections and environmental and infant factors influence acquisition of viral and bacterial infections in the perinatal and neonatal period. Scaling up evidence-based interventions addressing maternal risk factors and underlying causes could reduce neonatal infections by 84%. The emergence of new infections and increasing antimicrobial resistance present public health challenges that must be addressed to achieve substantial reductions in neonatal mortality.

KEYWORDS:

Antimicrobial resistance; Maternal health; Maternal infection; Neonatal morbidity; Neonatal mortality; Neonatal sepsis; Younger-than-5 mortality

PMID:
28734510
DOI:
10.1016/j.pcl.2017.03.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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