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Epilepsy Behav. 2017 Sep;74:130-134. doi: 10.1016/j.yebeh.2017.06.015. Epub 2017 Jul 19.

On status epilepticus and pins: A systematic content analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine 'B', Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, Israel; Zabludowicz Center for Autoimmune Diseases, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, Israel; Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel.
2
Post-graduate School of Public Health Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL), University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy; Section of Psychiatry, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation, Ophthalmology, Genetics and Maternal and Child Health (DINOGMI), University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy. Electronic address: robertobragazzi@gmail.com.
3
Department of Statistics and Operations Research, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel.
4
Section of Psychiatry, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation, Ophthalmology, Genetics and Maternal and Child Health (DINOGMI), University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy.
5
Department of Neuroscience, Biomedicine and Movement, University of Verona, Verona, Italy.
6
Padeh and Ziv Hospitals, Bar-Ilan Faculty of Medicine, Ramat Gan, Israel.

Abstract

Status epilepticus (SE) can be defined as abnormally prolonged, persistent, or recurrent clinical and/or electrographic epileptic activity and, as such, is a challenging medical emergency requiring an aggressive treatment aimed at promptly terminating the seizures. It imposes a relevant clinical burden, both in terms of comorbidity and mortality. In the era of the Web 2.0, most people search the Web to obtain SE-related information. The current investigation aimed at qualitatively characterizing the pins related to SE: Pinterest, "the world's catalog of ideas", is a visual social networking site that enables users to freely upload visual material, to bookmark, and to share it (repin). Using SE as a keyword, 192 pins were extracted and analyzed on the basis of their content. Fifty-five were found to meet the inclusion criteria. Fifty-six point four percent of the pins reported at least one cause of SE, the most quoted of which being remote brain injuries (47.3% of the pins); 54.5% and 45.5% of the included pins reported SE symptoms and diagnosis, respectively; 72.7% and 40.0% of pins focused on SE treatment and on prognosis, respectively; and 50.9%, 30.9%, and 40.0% of the pins were intended for physicians, medical/nursing students, and lay people, respectively. Only 12.7% of pins were patient-centered and devoted to fund-raising and advocacy. In the field of neurological diseases, Pinterest, despite being a "pinstructive" tool, is too much overlooked and underused for advocacy purposes. Healthcare workers and stakeholders should be aware of the opportunities offered by Pinterest and exploit this visual social networking site for raising awareness of the life-threatening condition of SE, promoting fund-raising campaigns.

KEYWORDS:

Participatory medicine; Pinterest; Social networks; Status epilepticus

PMID:
28734196
DOI:
10.1016/j.yebeh.2017.06.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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