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Int J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2017 Oct;46(10):1257-1266. doi: 10.1016/j.ijom.2017.06.018. Epub 2017 Jul 18.

Open treatment of unilateral mandibular condyle fractures in adults: a systematic review.

Author information

1
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Academic Medical Centre of Amsterdam, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: A.V.Rozeboom@amc.uva.nl.
2
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Academic Medical Centre of Amsterdam, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
3
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Academic Medical Centre of Groningen, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.

Abstract

Since the introduction of rigid internal fixation devices, more and more surgeons favour an open approach to treating condylar fractures of the mandible in adult patients. Different indications for open treatment have been published. Open treatment is associated with surgical complications because of the technique employed. The aim of this systematic review was to provide an overview of the studies published exclusively on open treatment, and to summarize the existing open treatment modalities and their clinical outcomes. A total of seventy studies were selected for detailed analysis. Most studies reported good results with regard to the outcome measures of open treatment. Surgical complications including hematoma, wound infection, weakness of the facial nerve, sialocele, salivary fistula, sensory disturbance of the great auricular nerve, unsatisfactory scarring, and fixation failure were reported in the studies. This review suggests that because of the high level of methodological variance in the relevant studies published to date, among other factors, there are currently no evidence-based conclusions or guidelines that can be formulated with regard to the most appropriate open treatment. Establishment of such standards could potentially improve treatment outcomes.

KEYWORDS:

Mandibular condyle; mandibular fracture; open; operative; surgical

PMID:
28732561
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijom.2017.06.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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