Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Adolesc Health. 2017 Oct;61(4):409-423. doi: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2017.04.004. Epub 2017 Jul 17.

Anxiety Among Adolescent Survivors of Pediatric Cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, St. John's University, Queens, New York; Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. Electronic address: mcdonneg@mskcc.org.
2
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, NYU School of Medicine Child Study Center, New York, New York.
3
Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York.
4
Medical Library, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York.
5
Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
6
New York University Silver School of Social Work, New York, New York.
7
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York.
8
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York; Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this review was to synthesize current knowledge about anxiety among adolescent survivors of pediatric cancer and highlights areas for future research.

METHODS:

Systematic literature searches were conducted in five databases for articles published anytime before December 28, 2015. Manuscripts were reviewed by a team of six coders. Included manuscripts reported outcomes relevant to anxiety, worry, and post-traumatic stress in survivors of pediatric cancer (age at the time of study: 10-22 years) who were off treatment.

RESULTS:

Twenty-four articles met inclusion criteria. Included results were categorized into the following domains: post-traumatic stress, anxiety, cancer-related worry, and interventions. With the exception of post-traumatic stress, there was little research about anxiety in this population; however, studies generally indicated that adolescent survivors of pediatric cancer are at elevated risk for anxiety, post-traumatic stress symptoms, and cancer-related worry.

CONCLUSIONS:

This review provides preliminary evidence that anxiety is a relevant, but understudied, psychosocial outcome for adolescent survivors of pediatric cancer. More research is needed to better understand the presentation of anxiety in this population, its effect on survivors' quality of life, and possible areas for intervention.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescent; Anxiety; Cancer; Survivor; Systematic review

PMID:
28729145
PMCID:
PMC5665366
DOI:
10.1016/j.jadohealth.2017.04.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center