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J Pediatr Nurs. 2017 Jul - Aug;35:120-128. doi: 10.1016/j.pedn.2017.03.014. Epub 2017 Apr 18.

Technology to Support Motivational Interviewing.

Author information

1
College of Nursing, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, 13120 E. 19th Avenue, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. Electronic address: bonnie.gance-cleveland@ucdenver.edu.
2
College of Nursing, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, 13120 E. 19th Avenue, Aurora, CO 80045, USA.
3
College of Nursing, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA. Electronic address: heather.aldrich@ucdenver.edu.
4
Raglan, New Zealand. Electronic address: kiaorakeri@gmail.com.
5
College of Nursing, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA. Electronic address: paul.cook@ucdenver.edu.
6
Department of Biostatistics and Informatics, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA. Electronic address: sarah.schmiege@ucdenver.edu.
7
College of Nursing, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA. Electronic address: mary.wold@ucdenver.edu.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This paper reports the findings of motivational interviewing (MI) training with and without technology support on school-based health center (SBHC) providers' satisfaction with MI training, providers' self-report of behavioral counseling related to childhood overweight/obesity, and parents' perception of care after training.

DESIGN AND METHODS:

The effects of training and technology on MI is part of a larger comparative effectiveness, cluster randomized trial. Twenty-four SBHCs in six states received virtual training on MI. Half the sites received HeartSmartKidsā„¢, a bilingual (English/Spanish), decision-support technology. The technology generated tailored patient education materials. Standard growth charts were plotted and health risks were highlighted to support MI counseling. The results of the MI training included provider satisfaction with MI training and parent assessment of the components of MI in their child's care. Providers and parents were surveyed at baseline, after training, and six months after training.

RESULTS:

Providers were satisfied with training and reported improvements in counseling proficiency (p<0.0007) and psychological/emotional assessment (p=0.0004) after training. Parents in the technology group reported significant improvement in provider support for healthy eating (p=0.04).

CONCLUSION:

Virtual training has the potential of preparing providers to use MI to address childhood obesity. Technology improved parent support for healthy eating. Future research should evaluate the impact of technology to support MI on patient outcomes.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS:

Childhood obesity guidelines emphasize that MI should be used to promote healthy weight in children. Training providers on MI may help more providers incorporate obesity guidelines in their practice.

KEYWORDS:

Childhood obesity; Health Disparities Learning Collaborative; Motivational interviewing; School-based health centers; Virtual training

PMID:
28728762
DOI:
10.1016/j.pedn.2017.03.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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