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Neurotoxicology. 2017 Sep;62:181-185. doi: 10.1016/j.neuro.2017.07.005. Epub 2017 Jul 15.

Exposure to pesticide as a risk factor for depression: A population-based longitudinal study in Korea.

Author information

1
Institute of Genomic Cohort, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju, Republic of Korea; Department of Preventive Medicine, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju, Republic of Korea; Center for Global Health and Social Medicine, Instiutute of Poverty Alleviation and International Development, Yonsei University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Psychiatry, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju, Republic of Korea.
3
National Academy of Agricultural Science, Rural Development Adminstration, Jeonju, Republic of Korea.
4
Institute of Genomic Cohort, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju, Republic of Korea.
5
Institute of Genomic Cohort, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: christinae@yonsei.ac.kr.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Exposure to pesticides is associated with mental disorders, including depression, especially among occupationally exposed populations, such as farmers. The results of experimental studies ascribed the negative effects of pesticides on mental health to their neurotoxic and endocrine-disrupting activities.

PURPOSE:

This study aimed to investigate the association between the risk of depression and high- or low-level exposure to pesticides in a rural population.

METHODS:

This longitudinal study was performed in 2005-2008 (baseline) and 2008-2012 (follow-up) to evaluate the risk of depression among 2151 Korean adults. A standardized questionnaire was used to obtain information on depression upon self-reported exposure to pesticide based on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the association between pesticide exposure and depression. We adjusted the data for age, cigarette smoking status, current alcohol use, monthly income, educational level, marriage status, and religion.

RESULTS:

Among the individuals who reported depression, the number of participants who used pesticides was significantly higher than that who did not (N=61 [7.2%] vs. N=54 [4.2%], P=0.003). A positive association was noted between >20-year period of pesticide use and depression (odds ratio [OR], 2.35; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41-3.88). Individuals who reported depression showed greater odds of being exposed to higher pesticide concentrations (OR, 2.33; 95% CI, 1.40-3.88) and experiencing pesticide poisoning (OR, 5.83; 95% CI, 1.80-18.86) than those who did not.

CONCLUSION:

Exposure to pesticides at a high concentration was found to be associated with depressive symptoms among Korean adults.

KEYWORDS:

Depression; Korean adult; Longitudinal study; Pesticide exposure

PMID:
28720389
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuro.2017.07.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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