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Nat Commun. 2017 Jul 18;8:16082. doi: 10.1038/ncomms16082.

Ancient European dog genomes reveal continuity since the Early Neolithic.

Author information

1
Department of Ecology and Evolution, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-5245, USA.
2
Department of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA.
3
Palaeogenetics Group, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, 55099 Mainz, Germany.
4
Smurfit Institute of Genetics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland.
5
Department of Human Genetics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA.
6
Department of Prehistoric Archaeology, Institute of Archaeology, Heritage Sciences and Art History, University of Bamberg, 96045 Bamberg, Germany.
7
Generaldirektion Kulturelles Erbe Rheinland-Pfalz, Direktion Landesarchäologie, Außenstelle Speyer, 67346 Speyer, Germany.
8
CNRS UMR 7044-UDS, 5 Allée du Général Rouvillois F 67083 Strasbourg, France.

Abstract

Europe has played a major role in dog evolution, harbouring the oldest uncontested Palaeolithic remains and having been the centre of modern dog breed creation. Here we sequence the genomes of an Early and End Neolithic dog from Germany, including a sample associated with an early European farming community. Both dogs demonstrate continuity with each other and predominantly share ancestry with modern European dogs, contradicting a previously suggested Late Neolithic population replacement. We find no genetic evidence to support the recent hypothesis proposing dual origins of dog domestication. By calibrating the mutation rate using our oldest dog, we narrow the timing of dog domestication to 20,000-40,000 years ago. Interestingly, we do not observe the extreme copy number expansion of the AMY2B gene characteristic of modern dogs that has previously been proposed as an adaptation to a starch-rich diet driven by the widespread adoption of agriculture in the Neolithic.

PMID:
28719574
PMCID:
PMC5520058
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms16082
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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