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Int J Cancer. 2017 Nov 15;141(10):1950-1962. doi: 10.1002/ijc.30891. Epub 2017 Aug 8.

Alcohol consumption and gastric cancer risk-A pooled analysis within the StoP project consortium.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, IRCCS - Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Milan, Italy.
2
Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, University of Milan, Italy.
3
Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, Italy.
4
Division of Molecular Medicine, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan.
5
Department of Epidemiology, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health and Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA.
6
Division of Epidemiology and Prevention, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan.
7
Department of Epidemiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, China.
8
School of Epidemiology, Public Health and Preventive Medicine (SEPHPM), University of Ottawa, ON, Canada.
9
Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute-Istituto per lo Studio e la Prevenzione Oncologica (ISPO), Florence, Italy.
10
Medical Informatics Center, Peking University, Peking, China.
11
Department of Public Health Sciences, Tobacco Center of Regulatory Science, Penn Sylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA.
12
ISPUP-EPIUnit, Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal.
13
Departamento de Epidemiologia Clínica, Medicina Preditiva e Saúde Pública, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade do Porto, Portugal.
14
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
15
Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Russian N.N. Blokhin Cancer Research Center, Moscow, Russia.
16
Public Health Institute of Navarra, IdiSNA, Pamplona, Spain.
17
CIBER de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Pamplona, Spain.
18
Research Group on Gene-Environment Interactions (GIGAS), University of Leòn, Leòn, Spain.
19
Department of Public Health, Miguel Hernandez University, Campus San Juan, Alicante, Spain.
20
Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
21
Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, School of Public Health and Health Professions, University at Buffalo, NY.
22
Department of Surgical Sciences, Division of General Surgery, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario "Agostino Gemelli", Rome, Italy.
23
Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY.
24
Department of Public Health and Community Health, School of Health Professions, Athens Technological Educational Institute, Athens, Greece.
25
Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece.
26
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA.
27
The Tisch Cancer Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, NY.
28
Section of Hygiene - Institute of Public Health, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario "Agostino Gemelli,", Rome, Italy.

Erratum in

Abstract

An association between heavy alcohol drinking and gastric cancer risk has been recently reported, but the issue is still open to discussion and quantification. We investigated the role of alcohol drinking on gastric cancer risk in the "Stomach cancer Pooling (StoP) Project," a consortium of epidemiological studies. A total of 9,669 cases and 25,336 controls from 20 studies from Europe, Asia and North America were included. We estimated summary odds-ratios (ORs) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) by pooling study-specific ORs using random-effects meta-regression models. Compared with abstainers, drinkers of up to 4 drinks/day of alcohol had no increase in gastric cancer risk, while the ORs were 1.26 (95% CI, 1.08-1.48) for heavy (>4 to 6 drinks/day) and 1.48 (95% CI 1.29-1.70) for very heavy (>6 drinks/day) drinkers. The risk for drinkers of >4 drinks/day was higher in never smokers (OR 1.87, 95% CI 1.35-2.58) as compared with current smokers (OR 1.14, 95% CI 0.93-1.40). Somewhat stronger associations emerged with heavy drinking in cardia (OR 1.61, 95% CI 1.11-2.34) than in non-cardia (OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.13-1.45) gastric cancers, and in intestinal-type (OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.20-1.97) than in diffuse-type (OR 1.29, 95% CI 1.05-1.58) cancers. The association was similar in strata of H. pylori infected (OR = 1.52, 95% CI 1.16-2.00) and noninfected subjects (OR = 1.69, 95% CI 0.95-3.01). Our collaborative pooled-analysis provides definite, more precise quantitative evidence than previously available of an association between heavy alcohol drinking and gastric cancer risk.

KEYWORDS:

alcohol drinking; case-control studies; gastric cancer; pooled analysis; risk factors

PMID:
28718913
DOI:
10.1002/ijc.30891
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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