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Plant Cell Environ. 2017 Dec;40(12):2909-2930. doi: 10.1111/pce.13028. Epub 2017 Aug 17.

Virulence determines beneficial trade-offs in the response of virus-infected plants to drought via induction of salicylic acid.

Author information

1
Departamento de Biología Medioambiental, Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas, CSIC, Madrid, 28040, Spain.
2
Departamento de Biología Molecular y Bioquímica, Instituto de Hortofruticultura Subtropical y Mediterránea, Universidad de Málaga-CSIC, Málaga, 2907, Spain.
3
Departamento de Bioquímica, Biología Celular y Molecular de Plantas, Estación Experimental del Zaidín, CSIC, Granada, 18008, Spain.
4
National Institute of Horticultural and Herbal Science, Rural Development Administration, Wanju, 55365, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

It has been hypothesized that plants can get beneficial trade-offs from viral infections when grown under drought conditions. However, experimental support for a positive correlation between virus-induced drought tolerance and increased host fitness is scarce. We investigated whether increased virulence exhibited by the synergistic interaction involving Potato virus X (PVX) and Plum pox virus (PPV) improves tolerance to drought and host fitness in Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis thaliana. Infection by the pair PPV/PVX and by PPV expressing the virulence protein P25 of PVX conferred an enhanced drought-tolerant phenotype compared with single infections with either PPV or PVX. Decreased transpiration rates in virus-infected plants were correlated with drought tolerance in N. benthamiana but not in Arabidopsis. Metabolite and hormonal profiles of Arabidopsis plants infected with the different viruses showed a range of changes that positively correlated with a greater impact on drought tolerance. Virus infection enhanced drought tolerance in both species by increasing salicylic acid accumulation in an abscisic acid-independent manner. Viable offspring derived from Arabidopsis plants infected with PPV increased relative to non-infected plants, when exposed to drought. By contrast, the detrimental effect caused by the more virulent viruses overcame potential benefits associated with increased drought tolerance on host fitness.

KEYWORDS:

Plum pox virus; Potato virus X; host fitness; virus-induced drought tolerance

PMID:
28718885
DOI:
10.1111/pce.13028
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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