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Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2018 Feb;26(2):212-221. doi: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.05.016. Epub 2017 Jun 1.

Aging and Post-Intensive Care Syndrome: A Critical Need for Geriatric Psychiatry.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN; Center of Health Innovation and Implementation Science, Center for Translational Science and Innovation, Indianapolis, IN; Sandra Eskenazi Center for Brain Care Innovation, Eskenazi Hospital, Indianapolis, IN. Electronic address: sophwang@iupui.edu.
2
Department of Internal Medicine, and Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, Sleep and Occupational Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN.
4
Sandra Eskenazi Center for Brain Care Innovation, Eskenazi Hospital, Indianapolis, IN; Department of Pharmacy Practice, Purdue University School of Pharmacy, West Lafayette, IN; IU Center of Aging Research, Regenstrief Institute, Indianapolis, IN.
5
Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN; Sandra Eskenazi Center for Brain Care Innovation, Eskenazi Hospital, Indianapolis, IN; IU Center of Aging Research, Regenstrief Institute, Indianapolis, IN.

Abstract

Because of the aging of the intensive care unit (ICU) population and an improvement in survival rates after ICU hospitalization, an increasing number of older adults are suffering from long-term impairments because of critical illness, known as post-intensive care syndrome (PICS). This article focuses on PICS-related cognitive, psychological, and physical impairments and the impact of ICU hospitalization on families and caregivers. The authors also describe innovative models of care for PICS and what roles geriatric psychiatrists could play in the future of this rapidly growing population.

KEYWORDS:

Aging; caregiver stress; cognitive impairment; critical care illness; delirium; intensive care unit; post–intensive care syndrome

PMID:
28716375
PMCID:
PMC5711627
DOI:
10.1016/j.jagp.2017.05.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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