Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Psychiatr Res. 2017 Nov;94:139-147. doi: 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2017.07.008. Epub 2017 Jul 8.

Oxytocin receptor gene polymorphisms, attachment, and PTSD: Results from the National Health and Resilience in Veterans Study.

Author information

1
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Clinical Neurosciences Division, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. Electronic address: lauren.sippel@va.gov.
2
Department of Psychiatry, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA, USA.
3
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Clinical Neurosciences Division, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
4
Department of Psychiatry, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Arq Psychotrauma Expert Group, Diemen, The Netherlands.
5
Department of Medicine (Biomedical Genetics), Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA.
6
Department of Medicine (Biomedical Genetics), Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; Departments of Neurology, Ophthalmology, Genetics and Genomics, Boston University Schools of Medicine and Public Health, Boston, MA, USA; Departments of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
7
Department of Psychiatry, Center for Studies of Addiction, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; Veterans Integrated Service Network 4 Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Center, Corporal Michael J. Crescenz VA Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
8
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Clinical Neurosciences Division, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA; Departments of Genetics and Neurobiology, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, USA.

Abstract

The human oxytocin system is implicated in social behavior and stress recovery. Polymorphisms in the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) may interact with attachment style to predict stress-related psychopathology like posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The objective of this study was to examine independent and interactive effects of the OXTR single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs53576, which has been associated with stress reactivity, support-seeking, and PTSD in prior studies, and attachment style on risk for PTSD in a nationally representative sample of 2163 European-American (EA) U.S. military veterans who participated in two independent waves of the National Health and Resilience in Veterans Study (NHRVS). Results revealed that insecure attachment style [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 4.29; p < 0.001] and the interaction of rs53576 and attachment style (OR = 2.58, p = 0.02) were associated with probable lifetime PTSD. Among individuals with the minor A allele, the prevalence of probable PTSD was significantly higher among those with an insecure attachment style (23.9%) than those with a secure attachment style (2.0%), equivalent to an adjusted OR of 10.7. We attempted to replicate these findings by utilizing dense marker data from a genome-wide association study of 2215 high-risk civilians; one OXTR variant, though not rs53576, was associated with PTSD. Exploratory analyses in the veteran sample revealed that the interaction between this variant and attachment style predicting probable PTSD approached statistical significance. Results indicate that polymorphisms in the OXTR gene and attachment style may contribute to vulnerability to PTSD in U.S. military veterans.

KEYWORDS:

Gene environment interaction; Insecure attachment; OXTR; Posttraumatic stress disorder; rs53576

PMID:
28715704
PMCID:
PMC5605420
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpsychires.2017.07.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center