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Nat Neurosci. 2017 Sep;20(9):1213-1216. doi: 10.1038/nn.4606. Epub 2017 Jul 17.

Gut microbiota is critical for the induction of chemotherapy-induced pain.

Author information

1
MGH Center for Translational Pain Research, Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
2
Department of Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, China.
3
Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
4
MGH/HST Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
5
Basic Sciences Institute, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, China.
6
Geriatric Anesthesia Research Unit, Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
7
Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.
8
Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Abstract

Chemotherapy-induced pain is a dose-limiting condition that affects 30% of patients undergoing chemotherapy. We found that gut microbiota promotes the development of chemotherapy-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. Oxaliplatin-induced mechanical hyperalgesia was reduced in germ-free mice and in mice pretreated with antibiotics. Restoring the microbiota of germ-free mice abrogated this protection. These effects appear to be mediated, in part, by TLR4 expressed on hematopoietic cells, including macrophages.

PMID:
28714953
PMCID:
PMC5575957
DOI:
10.1038/nn.4606
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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