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Neurogastroenterol Motil. 2017 Dec;29(12). doi: 10.1111/nmo.13151. Epub 2017 Jul 17.

Habitual diet and diet quality in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A case-control study.

Author information

1
Department of Genetics, University of Groningen, University Medical Centre Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
2
Top Institute Food and Nutrition (TIFN), Wageningen, The Netherlands.
3
Division Gastroenterology-Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, NUTRIM School for Nutrition, and Translational Research in Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Center+, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
4
Division of Human Nutrition, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Diet is considered to be a key factor in symptom generation in Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and patients tend to exclude food products from their diet in pursue of symptom relief, which may impair diet quality.

METHODS:

We evaluated habitual dietary intake in IBS patients with regard to nutrients and food products using an extensive food frequency questionnaire. One hundred ninety-four IBS patients were compared to 186 healthy controls using multiple logistic regression analysis. An overall diet quality score was calculated for each participant based on the criteria of the Dutch Healthy Diet (DHD) index.

KEY RESULTS:

A lower DHD-score was found for IBS (mean [SD]: 52.9 [9.6]) vs controls (55.1 [9.2], P=.02). The diet of patients was lower in fibers (21 g vs 25 g per day, P=.002) and fructose (14 g vs 16 g, P=.033), while higher in total fat (37% vs 36% of total energy intake, P=.010) and added sugars (46 g vs 44 g, P=.029). Differences in daily intake of food products included lower consumption of apples (40 g vs 69 g, P<.001), pasta (28 vs 37 g, P=.029) and alcoholic beverages (130 g vs 193 g, P=.024) and higher consumption of processed meat (38 g vs 29 g, P<.001). Some of these findings correlated with gastrointestinal symptoms, showing differences between IBS subtypes.

CONCLUSIONS AND INFERENCES:

Differences in habitual diet were described, showing lower diet quality in IBS patients compared to controls, with increased consumption of fat and lower intake of fibers and fructose. Our data support the importance of personalized and professional nutritional guidance of IBS patients.

KEYWORDS:

diet quality; habitual diet; irritable bowel syndrome

PMID:
28714091
DOI:
10.1111/nmo.13151
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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