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Front Neural Circuits. 2017 Jun 30;11:48. doi: 10.3389/fncir.2017.00048. eCollection 2017.

Deep Brain Magnetic Stimulation Promotes Neurogenesis and Restores Cholinergic Activity in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

Zhen J1,2,3, Qian Y1,2, Fu J3, Su R1,2, An H1,2, Wang W1,2, Zheng Y1,2, Wang X1,2.

Author information

1
Department of Neurobiology, Key Laboratory for Neurodegenerative Disorders of the Ministry of Education, Capital Medical UniversityBeijing, China.
2
Beijing Institute for Brain DisordersBeijing, China.
3
The Second Hospital of Hebei Medical UniversityShijiazhuang, China.

Abstract

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by progressive decline of memory and cognitive functions. Deep magnetic stimulation (DMS), a noninvasive and nonpharmacological brain stimulation, has been reported to alleviate stress-related cognitive impairment in neuropsychiatric disorders. Our previous study also discovered the preventive effect of DMS on cognitive decline in an AD mouse model. However, the underlying mechanism must be explored further. In this study, we investigated the effect of DMS on spatial learning and memory functions, neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG), as well as expression and activity of the cholinergic system in a transgenic mouse model of AD (5XFAD). Administration of DMS effectively improved performance in spatial learning and memory of 5XFAD mice. Furthermore, neurogenesis in the hippocampal DG of DMS-treated 5XFAD mice was clearly enhanced. In addition, DMS significantly raised the level of acetylcholine and prevented the increase in acetylcholinesterase activity as well as the decrease in acetyltransferase activity in the hippocampus of 5XFAD mice. These findings indicate that DMS may be a promising noninvasive tool for treatment and prevention of AD cognitive impairment by promoting neurogenesis and enhancing cholinergic system function.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer’s disease; cholinergic activity; cognition; hippocampus; neurogenesis

PMID:
28713248
PMCID:
PMC5492391
DOI:
10.3389/fncir.2017.00048
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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