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Mar Pollut Bull. 2017 Sep 15;122(1-2):464-469. doi: 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2017.06.017. Epub 2017 Jul 13.

Determination of trace metals and analysis of arsenic species in tropical marine fishes from Spratly islands.

Author information

1
Marine Ecology Research Center, First Institute of Oceanography of State Oceanic Administration, Qingdao 266061, China; Xiamen Huaxia University, Xiamen 361024, China. Electronic address: jxli@fio.org.cn.
2
Marine Ecology Research Center, First Institute of Oceanography of State Oceanic Administration, Qingdao 266061, China; Laboratory of Marine Drugs and Bioproducts, Qingdao National Laboratory for Marine Science and Technology, Qingdao 266071, China.
3
Marine Ecology Research Center, First Institute of Oceanography of State Oceanic Administration, Qingdao 266061, China; Laboratory of Marine Ecology and Environmental Science, Qingdao National Laboratory for Marine Science and Technology, Qingdao 266071, China.
4
Marine Ecology Research Center, First Institute of Oceanography of State Oceanic Administration, Qingdao 266061, China.
5
Marine Ecology Research Center, First Institute of Oceanography of State Oceanic Administration, Qingdao 266061, China; Xiamen Huaxia University, Xiamen 361024, China.

Abstract

Trace metal contents in 38 species of tropical marine fishes harvested from the Spratly islands of China were determined by microwave digestion and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis. Arsenic species were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis. The average levels of Al, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Mo, Cd, Pb, and U in the fish samples were 1.683, 0.350, 0.367, 2.954, 36.615, 0.087, 0.319, 1.566, 21.946, 20.845, 2.526, 3.583, 0.225, 0.140, and 0.061mg·kg-1, respectively; Fe, Zn, and As were found at high concentrations. The trace metals exhibited significant positive correlation between each other, with r value of 0.610-0.852. Further analysis indicated that AsB (8.560-31.020mg·kg-1) was the dominant arsenic species in the fish samples and accounted for 31.48% to 47.24% of the total arsenic. As(III) and As(V) were detected at low concentrations, indicating minimal arsenic toxicity.

KEYWORDS:

Arsenic species; Bioaccumulation; Spratly islands; Trace metals; Tropical fishes

PMID:
28712770
DOI:
10.1016/j.marpolbul.2017.06.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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