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Diabetes Metab Syndr. 2017 Dec;11 Suppl 2:S957-S961. doi: 10.1016/j.dsx.2017.07.022. Epub 2017 Jul 8.

Longitudinal changes in visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue and metabolic syndrome: Results from the Multicultural Community Health Assessment Trial (M-CHAT).

Author information

1
School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. Electronic address: andrew.tu@alumni.ubc.ca.
2
Division of Cardiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
3
Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada.

Abstract

AIM:

Few studies have examined whether longitudinal changes in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), independent of each other, are associated with the risk of developing metabolic syndrome (MetS). The objective of this study was to examine the longitudinal effects of VAT and SAT on MetS and metabolic risk factors in a multi-ethnic sample of Canadians followed for 5-years.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

In total, 598 adults of the Multicultural Community Health Assessment Trial (M-CHAT) were included in this study. Assessments of body composition using computed tomography (CT) and metabolic risk factors were conducted at baseline, 3-, and 5-years. Mixed-effects logistic regression was used to model the longitudinal effects of VAT and SAT on MetS and metabolic risk factors.

RESULTS:

There were significant between-person (cross-sectional) effects such that for every 10cm2 higher VAT, the odds of MetS, high-risk fasting glucose levels and high-risk HDL-C levels significantly increased by 16% (95% CI: 9-24%), 11% (3-20%), and 7% (0-14%) respectively. Significant within-person (longitudinal) effects were also found such that for every 10cm2 increase in VAT the odds of MetS and high-risk triglyceride levels significantly increased by 23% (9-39%) and 30% (14-48%), respectively. Cross-sectional or longitudinal changes in SAT were not associated with MetS or metabolic risk factors.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study found a direct relationship between longitudinal change in VAT and MetS risk independent of changes in SAT. Clinical practice should focus on the reduction of VAT to improve cardiovascular health outcomes.

KEYWORDS:

Longitudinal study; Metabolic syndrome; Subcutaneous adipose tissue; Visceral adipose tissue

PMID:
28711515
DOI:
10.1016/j.dsx.2017.07.022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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