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Alzheimers Dement. 2017 Dec;13(12):1364-1370. doi: 10.1016/j.jalz.2017.04.012. Epub 2017 Jul 12.

Association of cancer and Alzheimer's disease risk in a national cohort of veterans.

Author information

1
Division of Aging, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
2
Oslo Centre for Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
3
Division of Aging, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology and Resource Information Center (MAVERIC), VA Boston Healthcare System (VABHS), Jamaica Plain, MA, USA.
4
Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology and Resource Information Center (MAVERIC), VA Boston Healthcare System (VABHS), Jamaica Plain, MA, USA; Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
5
Division of Hematology-Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA.
6
Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
7
Division of Aging, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology and Resource Information Center (MAVERIC), VA Boston Healthcare System (VABHS), Jamaica Plain, MA, USA; Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, VABHS, Jamaica Plain, MA, USA. Electronic address: jane.driver@va.gov.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

To examine the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) among cancer survivors in a national database.

METHODS:

Retrospective cohort of 3,499,378 mostly male US veterans aged ≥65 years were followed between 1996 and 2011. We used Cox models to estimate risk of AD and alternative outcomes (non-AD dementia, osteoarthritis, stroke, and macular degeneration) in veterans with and without a history of cancer.

RESULTS:

Survivors of a wide variety of cancers had modestly lower AD risk, but increased risk of the alternative outcomes. Survivors of screened cancers, including prostate cancer, had a slightly increased AD risk. Cancer treatment was independently associated with decreased AD risk; those who received chemotherapy had a lower risk than those who did not.

DISCUSSION:

Survivors of some cancers have a lower risk of AD but not other age-related conditions, arguing that lower AD diagnosis is not simply due to bias. Cancer treatment may be associated with decreased risk of AD.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer's disease; Cancer; Cancer therapy; Chemotherapy; Epidemiology; Inverse association; Radiation; Risk; Survival bias

PMID:
28711346
PMCID:
PMC5743228
DOI:
10.1016/j.jalz.2017.04.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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