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Sci Rep. 2017 Jul 14;7(1):5481. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-05632-2.

Effects of the mode of re-socialization after juvenile social isolation on medial prefrontal cortex myelination and function.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Nara, Japan. mmm@naramed-u.ac.jp.
2
Department of Psychiatry, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Nara, Japan.
3
Department of Neuropsychiatry, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyusyu University, Fukuoka, Japan.
4
Department of Anatomy and Neuroscience, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Nara, Japan.

Abstract

Social isolation is an important factor in the development of psychiatric disorders. It is necessary to develop an effective psychological treatment, such as cognitive rehabilitation, for children who have already suffered from social isolation, such as neglect and social rejection. We used socially isolated mice to validate whether elaborate re-socialization after juvenile social isolation can restore hypomyelination in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the attendant functions manifested in socially isolated mice. While mice who underwent re-socialization with socially isolated mice after juvenile social isolation (Re-IS mice) demonstrated less mPFC activity during exposure to a strange mouse, as well as thinner myelin in the mPFC than controls, mice who underwent re-socialization with socially housed mice after juvenile social isolation (Re-SH mice) caught up with the controls in terms of most mPFC functions, as well as myelination. Moreover, social interaction of Re-IS mice was reduced as compared to controls, but Re-SH mice showed an amount of social interaction comparable to that of controls. These results suggest that the mode of re-socialization after juvenile social isolation has significant effects on myelination in the mPFC and the attendant functions in mice, indicating the importance of appropriate psychosocial intervention after social isolation.

PMID:
28710465
PMCID:
PMC5511224
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-017-05632-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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