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Int J Mol Sci. 2017 Jul 14;18(7). pii: E1526. doi: 10.3390/ijms18071526.

Gut-CNS-Axis as Possibility to Modulate Inflammatory Disease Activity-Implications for Multiple Sclerosis.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, University Hospital Muenster, 48149 Muenster, Germany. ann-katrin.fleck@ukmuenster.de.
2
Institute of Translational Immunology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, 55131 Mainz, Germany. detlef.schuppan@unimedizin-mainz.de.
3
Division of Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA. detlef.schuppan@unimedizin-mainz.de.
4
Department of Neurology, University Hospital Muenster, 48149 Muenster, Germany. heinz.wiendl@ukmuenster.de.
5
Department of Neurology, University Hospital Muenster, 48149 Muenster, Germany. luisa.klotz@ukmuenster.de.

Abstract

In the last decade the role of environmental factors as modulators of disease activity and progression has received increasing attention. In contrast to classical environmental modulators such as exposure to sun-light or fine dust pollution, nutrition is an ideal tool for a personalized human intervention. Various studies demonstrate a key role of dietary factors in autoimmune diseases including Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), rheumatoid arthritis or inflammatory central nervous system (CNS) diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS). In this review we discuss the connection between diet and inflammatory processes via the gut-CNS-axis. This axis describes a bi-directional communication system and comprises neuronal signaling, neuroendocrine pathways and modulation of immune responses. Therefore, the gut-CNS-axis represents an emerging target to modify CNS inflammatory activity ultimately opening new avenues for complementary and adjunctive treatment of autoimmune diseases such as MS.

KEYWORDS:

gut–CNS-axis; immune system; microbiota; multiple sclerosis; nutrition

PMID:
28708108
PMCID:
PMC5536015
DOI:
10.3390/ijms18071526
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no conflict of interest. Heinz Wiendl received compensation for serving on Scientific Advisory Boards/Steering Committees for Bayer Healthcare, Biogen Idec, Genzyme, Merck Serono, Novartis and Sanofi Aventis. He has received speaker honoraria and travel support from Bayer Vital GmbH, Bayer Schering AG, Biogen Idec, CSL Behring, Fresenius Medical Care, Genzyme, Glaxo Smith Kline, GW Pharmaceuticals, Lundbeck, Merck Serono, Omniamed, Novartis and Sanofi Aventis. He has received compensation as a consultant from Biogen Idec, Merck Serono, Novartis and Sanofi Aventis. Heinz Wiendl received research support from Bayer Vital, Biogen Idec, Genzyme Merck Serono, Novartis, Sanofi Aventis Germany, Sanofi US. Luisa Klotz received compensation for serving on Scientific Advisory Boards for Genzyme and Novartis. She received speaker honoraria and travel support from Novartis, Merck Serono and CSL Behring. She receives research support from Novartis and Biogen Idec. Detlef Schuppan received compensation for serving on Scientific Advisory Boards for Amarin, BMS, Boehringer-Ingelheim, Gilead, Nestle, Nimbus, Novartis, Roivant, Takeda and Zealand. He has received research support from Boehringer-Ingelheim.

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