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Nutrients. 2017 Jul 14;9(7). pii: E750. doi: 10.3390/nu9070750.

Is Sweet Taste Perception Associated with Sweet Food Liking and Intake?

Author information

1
School of Food and Nutrition, College of Health, Massey University, Auckland 0745, New Zealand. S.N.Jayasinghe@massey.ac.nz.
2
School of Food and Nutrition, College of Health, Massey University, Auckland 0745, New Zealand. R.Kruger@massey.ac.nz.
3
Institute for Natural and Mathematical Sciences, College of Sciences, Massey University, Auckland 0745, New Zealand. dciwalsh@gmail.com.
4
School of Food and Nutrition, College of Health, Massey University, Auckland 0745, New Zealand. caoguojiao_120@hotmail.com.
5
School of Food and Nutrition, College of Health, Massey University, Auckland 0745, New Zealand. staceyrivers2@gmail.com.
6
School of Food and Nutrition, College of Health, Massey University, Auckland 0745, New Zealand. M.Richter@massey.ac.nz.
7
School of Food and Nutrition, College of Health, Massey University, Auckland 0745, New Zealand. B.Breier@massey.ac.nz.

Abstract

A range of psychophysical taste measurements are used to characterize an individual's sweet taste perception and to assess links between taste perception and dietary intake. The aims of this study were to investigate the relationship between four different psychophysical measurements of sweet taste perception, and to explore which measures of sweet taste perception relate to sweet food intake. Forty-four women aged 20-40 years were recruited for the study. Four measures of sweet taste perception (detection and recognition thresholds, and sweet taste intensity and hedonic liking of suprathreshold concentrations) were assessed using glucose as the tastant. Dietary measurements included a four-day weighed food record, a sweet food-food frequency questionnaire and a sweet beverage liking questionnaire. Glucose detection and recognition thresholds showed no correlation with suprathreshold taste measurements or any dietary intake measurement. Importantly, sweet taste intensity correlated negatively with total energy and carbohydrate (starch, total sugar, fructose, glucose) intakes, frequency of sweet food intake and sweet beverage liking. Furthermore, sweet hedonic liking correlated positively with total energy and carbohydrate (total sugar, fructose, glucose) intakes. The present study shows a clear link between sweet taste intensity and hedonic liking with sweet food liking, and total energy, carbohydrate and sugar intake.

KEYWORDS:

beverage liking; food intake; glucose thresholds; hedonic liking; sweet taste intensity

PMID:
28708085
PMCID:
PMC5537864
DOI:
10.3390/nu9070750
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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