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Am J Clin Dermatol. 2018 Feb;19(1):103-117. doi: 10.1007/s40257-017-0301-1.

Natural Oils for Skin-Barrier Repair: Ancient Compounds Now Backed by Modern Science.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, University of California-Davis, Sacramento, CA, USA.
2
Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
3
Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Sacramento, CA, USA.
4
Department of Medicine, Dermatology Division, Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, PO BOX 245024, 1515 N. Campbell Ave., Building #222, Levy Bldg., 1906E, Tucson, AZ, 85724-5024, USA. vshi@email.arizona.edu.

Abstract

Natural plant oils are commonly used as topical therapy worldwide. They are usually easily accessible and are relatively inexpensive options for skin care. Many natural oils possess specific compounds with antimicrobial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-itch properties, making them attractive alternative and complementary treatments for xerotic and inflammatory dermatoses associated with skin-barrier disruption. Unique characteristics of various oils are important when considering their use for topical skin care. Differing ratios of essential fatty acids are major determinants of the barrier repair benefits of natural oils. Oils with a higher linoleic acid to oleic acid ratio have better barrier repair potential, whereas oils with higher amounts of irritating oleic acid may be detrimental to skin-barrier function. Various extraction methods for oils exist, including cold pressing to make unrefined oils, heat and chemical distillation to make essential oils, and the addition of various chemicals to simulate a specific scent to make fragranced oils. The method of oil processing and refinement is an important component of selecting oil for skin care, and cold pressing is the preferred method of oil extraction as the heat- and chemical-free process preserves beneficial lipids and limits irritating byproducts. This review summarizes evidence on utility of natural plant-based oils in dermatology, particularly in repairing the natural skin-barrier function, with the focus on natural oils, including Olea europaea (olive oil), Helianthus annus (sunflower seed oil), Cocos nucifera (coconut oil), Simmondsia chinesis (jojoba oil), Avena sativa (oat oil), and Argania spinosa (argan oil).

PMID:
28707186
DOI:
10.1007/s40257-017-0301-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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