Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2018 Jan;26(1):203-211. doi: 10.1007/s00167-017-4645-0. Epub 2017 Jul 13.

The Shoulder Instability-Return to Sport after Injury (SIRSI): a valid and reproducible scale to quantify psychological readiness to return to sport after traumatic shoulder instability.

Author information

1
Institut de l'Appareil Locomoteur Nollet, 75017, Paris, France.
2
Clinique du Sport, 36, Boulevard Saint-Marcel, 75005, Paris, France.
3
Institut de l'Appareil Locomoteur Nollet, 75017, Paris, France. klouche_shahnaz@yahoo.fr.
4
Clinique du Sport, 36, Boulevard Saint-Marcel, 75005, Paris, France. klouche_shahnaz@yahoo.fr.
5
, Racing 92, 92350, Le Plessis-Robinson, France.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The main goal of this study was to propose and validate a tool to quantify the psychological readiness of athletes to return to sport following traumatic shoulder instability and conservative or surgical management.

METHODS:

«Knee» was replaced by the term «shoulder» in the Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Return to Sport after Injury scale. This pilot test of the Shoulder Instability-Return to Sport after Injury scale (SIRSI) was performed in a group of athletes who underwent surgery for post-traumatic chronic anterior shoulder instability. The final version was then validated according to the international COSMIN methodology. A retrospective study was performed including all rugby players who had reported an episode of instability between 2012 and 2013. The WOSI and the Walch-Duplay scales were used as reference questionnaires.

RESULTS:

Sixty-two patients were included, mean age 26 ± 5.2 years old, 5 women/57 men. Patients were professional or competitive athletes (70.9%) and followed-up for 4.6 ± 1.6 years after the first episode of shoulder instability. Shoulder surgery was performed in 30/62 (48.4%) patients, a mean 1.6 ± 1.2 years after the first episode of instability. The SIRSI was strongly correlated with the reference questionnaires (r = 0.80, p < 10-5). The mean SIRSI score was significantly higher in patients who returned to play rugby (60.9 ± 26.6% vs 38.1 ± 25.6%, p = 0.001). The internal consistency of the scale was high (α = 0.96). Reproducibility of the test-retest was excellent (ρ = 0.93, 95% CI [0.89-0.96], p < 10-5). No ceiling/floor effects were found.

CONCLUSION:

The SIRSI is a valid, reproducible scale that identifies patients who are ready to return to the same sport after an episode of shoulder instability, whether they undergo surgery or not.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

III.

KEYWORDS:

Dislocation; Instability; Psychological readiness; Return to sport; Shoulder; Subluxation

PMID:
28707114
DOI:
10.1007/s00167-017-4645-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center