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Appetite. 2017 Oct 1;117:365-372. doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2017.07.006. Epub 2017 Jul 10.

Deal or no deal? The prevalence and nutritional quality of price promotions among U.S. food and beverage purchases.

Author information

1
Carolina Population Center, Dept. of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 137 E Franklin St, CB #8120, Chapel Hill, NC 27514, USA. Electronic address: smithlp@email.unc.edu.
2
Carolina Population Center, Dept. of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 137 E Franklin St, CB #8120, Chapel Hill, NC 27514, USA.
3
Duke-UNC USDA Center for Behavioral Economics and Healthy Food Choice Research, 140 Science Drive, 230P Gross Hall, Duke University, Box 90989, Durham, NC 27708-0989, USA.
4
Dept. of Economics, University of California, 3207 Social Science Plaza B, Irvine, CA 92697, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study examines trends in the prevalence of price promotions among packaged food and beverage purchases, differences in prevalence by household race/ethnicity or income, and the association between price promotions and the nutritional profile of purchases.

DESIGN:

This cross-sectional study utilizes a dataset of 90 million purchases from 38,744 (2008) to 45,042 (2012) US households in 2008-2012. Chi-square tests were used to examine whether the proportion of purchases with price promotions changed over time or differed by household race/ethnicity or income. T-tests were used to compare purchased products' nutritional profiles.

RESULTS:

Prevalence of price promotions among packaged food and beverage purchases increased by 8% and 6%, respectively, from 2008 to 2012, with both reaching 34% by 2012. Higher-income households had greater proportions of purchases with price promotions than lower-income households. Asian households had the highest proportion of purchases with any price promotion, followed by non-Hispanic whites. While total price-promoted packaged food purchases had higher mean energy, total sugar, and saturated fat densities than purchases with no price promotions, absolute differences were small.

CONCLUSIONS:

Prevalence of price promotions among US household purchases increased from 2008 to 2012 and was greater for higher-income households. No clear associations emerged between presence of price promotions and nutritional quality of purchases.

KEYWORDS:

Food costs; Food marketing; Nutrition; Packaged foods; Price promotions

PMID:
28705473
PMCID:
PMC5574185
DOI:
10.1016/j.appet.2017.07.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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