Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Bioorg Med Chem. 2017 Aug 15;25(16):4487-4496. doi: 10.1016/j.bmc.2017.06.040. Epub 2017 Jun 30.

Nanoparticle-macrophage interactions: A balance between clearance and cell-specific targeting.

Author information

1
Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, United States; Michigan Nanotechnology Institute for Medicine and Biological Sciences, and Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, United States.
2
Michigan Nanotechnology Institute for Medicine and Biological Sciences, and Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, United States.
3
Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, United States.
4
Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, United States; Ann Arbor Veterans Affairs Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, United States.
5
Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, United States; Ann Arbor Veterans Affairs Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, United States; Michigan Nanotechnology Institute for Medicine and Biological Sciences, and Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, United States. Electronic address: sngoonew@med.umich.edu.

Abstract

The surface properties of nanoparticles (NPs) are a major factor that influences how these nanomaterials interact with biological systems. Interactions between NPs and macrophages of the reticuloendothelial system (RES) can reduce the efficacy of NP diagnostics and therapeutics. Traditionally, to limit NP clearance by the RES system, the NP surface is neutralized with molecules like poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) which are known to resist protein adsorption and RES clearance. Unfortunately, PEG modification is not without drawbacks including difficulties with the synthesis and associations with immune reactions. To overcome some of these obstacles, we neutralized the NP surface by acetylation and compared this modification to PEGylation for RES clearance and tumor-specific targeting. We found that acetylation was comparable to PEGylation in reducing RES clearance. Additionally, we found that dendrimer acetylation did not impact folic acid (FA)-mediated targeting of tumor cells whereas PEG surface modification reduced the targeting ability of the NP. These results clarify the impact of different NP surface modifications on RES clearance and cell-specific targeting and provide insights into the design of more effective NPs.

PMID:
28705434
PMCID:
PMC5653216
DOI:
10.1016/j.bmc.2017.06.040
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center