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J Neurophysiol. 2017 Sep 1;118(3):1784-1799. doi: 10.1152/jn.00734.2016. Epub 2017 Jul 12.

Fast voltage-sensitive dye imaging of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission in the rat granular retrosplenial cortex.

Author information

1
Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo, Japan.
2
ERATO Okanoya Emotional Information Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, Japan.
3
Emotional Information Joint Research Laboratory, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, Japan; and.
4
Molecular Analysis of Higher Brain Function (Ichinohe group), RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, Japan.
5
ERATO Okanoya Emotional Information Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, Japan; kurotani@brain.riken.jp.

Abstract

Rodent granular retrosplenial cortex (GRS) has dense connections between the anterior thalamic nuclei (ATN) and hippocampal formation. GRS superficial pyramidal neurons exhibit distinctive late spiking (LS) firing property and form patchy clusters with prominent apical dendritic bundles. The aim of this study was to investigate spatiotemporal dynamics of signal transduction in the GRS induced by ATN afferent stimulation by using fast voltage-sensitive dye imaging in rat brain slices. In coronal slices, layer 1a stimulation, which presumably activated thalamic fibers, evoked propagation of excitatory synaptic signals from layers 2-4 to layers 5-6 in a direction perpendicular to the layer axis, followed by transverse signal propagation within each layer. In the presence of ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists, inhibitory responses were observed in superficial layers, induced by direct activation of inhibitory interneurons in layer 1. In horizontal slices, excitatory signals in deep layers propagated transversely mainly from posterior to anterior via superficial layers. Cortical inhibitory responses upon layer 1a stimulation in horizontal slices were weaker than those in the coronal slices. Observed differences between coronal and horizontal planes suggest anisotropy of the intracortical circuitry. In conclusion, ATN inputs are processed differently in coronal and horizontal planes of the GRS and then conveyed to other cortical areas. In both planes, GRS superficial layers play an important role in signal propagation, which suggests that superficial neuronal cascade is crucial in the integration of multiple information sources.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Superficial neurons in the rat granular retrosplenial cortex (GRS) show distinctive late-spiking (LS) firing property. However, little is known about spatiotemporal dynamics of signal transduction in the GRS. We demonstrated LS neuron network relaying thalamic inputs to deep layers and anisotropic distribution of inhibition between coronal and horizontal planes. Since deep layers of the GRS receive inputs from the subiculum, GRS circuits may work as an integrator of multiple sources such as sensory and memory information.

KEYWORDS:

cortical layers; retrosplenial cortex; synaptic transmission; voltage-sensitive dye imaging

PMID:
28701546
PMCID:
PMC5596128
DOI:
10.1152/jn.00734.2016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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