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J Ovarian Res. 2017 Jul 12;10(1):44. doi: 10.1186/s13048-017-0342-3.

Follicular Fluid redox involvement for ovarian follicle growth.

Freitas C1,2, Neto AC3,4, Matos L3,4,5, Silva E3,4, Ribeiro Â3,4,6, Silva-Carvalho JL2,3,6,7, Almeida H8,9,10.

Author information

1
Reproductive Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Hospital Dr. Nélio Mendonça, SESARAM, Funchal, Portugal.
2
Departamento de Ginecologia e Obstetrícia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal.
3
IBMC - Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular and Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde - i3S, Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal.
4
Ageing and Stress Group, Experimental Biology Unit - Department of Biomedicine, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal.
5
Faculdade de Ciências da Nutrição e Alimentação and Faculdade de Medicina Dentária, Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal.
6
CETI - Centro de Estudo e Tratamento da Infertilidade, Porto, Portugal.
7
Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Hospital CUF-Porto, 4100 180, Porto, Portugal.
8
IBMC - Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular and Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde - i3S, Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal. almeidah@med.up.pt.
9
Ageing and Stress Group, Experimental Biology Unit - Department of Biomedicine, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal. almeidah@med.up.pt.
10
Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Hospital CUF-Porto, 4100 180, Porto, Portugal. almeidah@med.up.pt.

Abstract

As the human ovarian follicle enlarges in the course of a regular cycle or following controlled ovarian stimulation, the changes in its structure reveal the oocyte environment composed of cumulus oophorus cells and the follicular fluid (FF).In contrast to the dynamic nature of cells, the fluid compartment appears as a reservoir rich in biomolecules. In some aspects, it is similar to the plasma, but it also exhibits differences that likely relate to its specific localization around the oocyte. The chemical composition indicates that the follicular fluid is able to detect and buffer excessive amounts of reactive oxygen species, employing a variety of antioxidants, some of them components of the intracellular milieu.An important part is played by albumin through specific cysteine residues. But the fluid contains other molecules whose cysteine residues may be involved in sensing and buffering the local oxidative conditions. How these molecules are recruited and regulated to intervene such process is unknown but it is a critical issue in reproduction.In fact, important proteins in the FF, that regulate follicle growth and oocyte quality, exhibit cysteine residues at specific points, whose untoward oxidation would result in functional loss. Therefore, preservation of controlled oxidative conditions in the FF is a requirement for the fine-tuned oocyte maturation process. In contrast, its disturbance enhances the susceptibility to the establishment of reproductive disorders that would require the intervention of reproductive medicine technology.

KEYWORDS:

Cumulus Oophorus cells; Follicular fluid; Oocyte maturation; Oxidative stress

PMID:
28701210
PMCID:
PMC5508613
DOI:
10.1186/s13048-017-0342-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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