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Dementia (London). 2017 Jan 1:1471301217714093. doi: 10.1177/1471301217714093. [Epub ahead of print]

Assistive technologies to address capabilities of people with dementia: From research to practice.

Author information

1
Fondation Médéric Alzheimer, Paris, France.
2
CoBTeK Lab & INRIA STARS, Université Côte-d'Azur, Nice, France.
3
Institute of Mental Health, University of Nottingham, UK.
4
Department of Psychiatry, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
5
Bournemouth University Dementia Institute, UK.
6
Salford Institute for Dementia University of Salford, Salford, United Kingdom.
7
Sao-Mai Nguyen, Lab-STICC, Institut Mines-Télécom Bretagne, Brest, France.
8
Department of Neurobiology, Care sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
9
Laboratoire Lusage, Hôpital Broca, Assistance publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, France.
10
Centre Mémoire de Ressources et de Recherche, CHU de Nice; Université Côte-d'Azur, CoBTeK, Nice, France.
11
Department of Neurology, Liège University Hospital, Belgium.
12
Department of General Practice and Elderly Care Medicine, Amsterdaù Public Health Research Institute, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
13
Laboratoire LIRTES, Université Paris-Est-Val de Marne, Créteil, France.
14
Université Côte-d'Azur, CoBTeK, & Innovation Alzheimer Association, Nice, France.
15
Université Côte-d'Azur, INRIA STARS & CoBTeK, Nice, France.

Abstract

Assistive technologies became pervasive and virtually present in all our life domains. They can be either an enabler or an obstacle leading to social exclusion. The Fondation Médéric Alzheimer gathered international experts of dementia care, with backgrounds in biomedical, human and social sciences, to analyze how assistive technologies can address the capabilities of people with dementia, on the basis of their needs. Discussion covered the unmet needs of people with dementia, the domains of daily life activities where assistive technologies can provide help to people with dementia, the enabling and empowering impact of technology to improve their safety and wellbeing, barriers and limits of use, technology assessment, ethical and legal issues. The capability approach (possible freedom) appears particularly relevant in person-centered dementia care and technology development. The focus is not on the solution, rather on what the person can do with it: seeing dementia as disability, with technology as an enabler to promote capabilities of the person, provides a useful framework for both research and practice. This article summarizes how these concepts took momentum in professional practice and public policies in the past 15 years (2000-2015), discusses current issues in the design, development and economic model of assistive technologies for people with dementia, and covers how these technologies are being used and assessed.

KEYWORDS:

assessment; assistive technologies; capabilities; dementia; economics; empowerment; ethics; human rights; psychosocial model of disability; public policies

PMID:
28699364
DOI:
10.1177/1471301217714093

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