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Antioxid Redox Signal. 2017 Oct 20;27(12):823-838. doi: 10.1089/ars.2017.7263. Epub 2017 Aug 10.

Redox Signaling in Diabetic Wound Healing Regulates Extracellular Matrix Deposition.

Author information

1
1 Department of Pathology, Yale University School of Medicine , New Haven, Connecticut.
2
2 Interdepartmental Program in Vascular Biology and Therapeutics, Yale University School of Medicine , New Haven, Connecticut.
3
3 Department of Biomedical Engineering, Yale University , New Haven, Connecticut.

Abstract

SIGNIFICANCE:

Impaired wound healing is a major complication of diabetes, and can lead to development of chronic foot ulcers in a significant number of patients. Despite the danger posed by poor healing, very few specific therapies exist, leaving patients at risk of hospitalization, amputation, and further decline in overall health. Recent Advances: Redox signaling is a key regulator of wound healing, especially through its influence on the extracellular matrix (ECM). Normal redox signaling is disrupted in diabetes leading to several pathological mechanisms that alter the balance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and scavenging. Importantly, pathological oxidative stress can alter ECM structure and function.

CRITICAL ISSUES:

There is limited understanding of the specific role of altered redox signaling in the diabetic wound, although there is evidence that ROS are involved in the underlying pathology.

FUTURE DIRECTIONS:

Preclinical studies of antioxidant-based therapies for diabetic wound healing have yielded promising results. Redox-based therapeutics constitute a novel approach for the treatment of wounds in diabetes patients that deserve further investigation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 823-838.

KEYWORDS:

collagen; diabetes; extracellular matrix; reactive oxygen species; wound healing

PMID:
28699352
PMCID:
PMC5647483
DOI:
10.1089/ars.2017.7263
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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