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Mayo Clin Proc. 2017 Aug;92(8):1190-1202. doi: 10.1016/j.mayocp.2017.03.010. Epub 2017 Jul 8.

Association Between Caffeine Intake and All-Cause and Cause-Specific Mortality: A Population-Based Prospective Cohort Study.

Author information

1
Department of Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolism, Center Hospital, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: ttsujimoto@hosp.ncgm.go.jp.
2
Department of Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolism, Center Hospital, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
3
Department of Clinical Study and Informatics, Center for Clinical Sciences, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; Department of Public Health/Health Policy, the University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess whether caffeine intake is associated with all-cause and cause-specific mortality.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

We conducted a prospective cohort study using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2010. Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare the multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of participants with a caffeine intake of 10 to 99, 100 to 199, and 200 mg/d or more with those of participants with a caffeine intake of less than 10 mg/d.

RESULTS:

In total, 17,594 participants were included, and the mean ± SD and median (interquartile range) follow-up was 6.5±2.8 years and 6.4 (3.6-9.5) years, respectively; 17,568 participants (99.8%) completed the follow-up, and 1310 died. Compared with those who had a caffeine intake of less than 10 mg/d, HRs and 95% CIs for all-cause mortality were significantly lower in participants with a caffeine intake of 10 to 99 mg/d (HR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.66-1.00; P=.05), 100 to 199 mg/d (HR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.51-0.78; P<.001), and 200 or more mg/d (HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.58-0.83; P<.001). A similar association was observed in participants who consumed less than 1 cup of coffee per week, and the HR was lowest in those with a caffeine intake of 100 to 199 mg/d (HR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.22-0.93). There was no association between caffeine intake and cardiovascular mortality, whereas the HRs for noncardiovascular mortality were significantly lower in those with a caffeine intake of 10 to 99 mg/d (HR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.57-0.95; P=.01), 100 to 199 mg/d (HR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.46-0.77; P<.001), and 200 or more mg/d (HR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.53-0.80; P<.001).

CONCLUSION:

Moderate caffeine intake was associated with a decreased risk of all-cause mortality, regardless of the presence or absence of coffee consumption.

PMID:
28697850
DOI:
10.1016/j.mayocp.2017.03.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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