Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
BMC Med Educ. 2017 Jul 11;17(1):114. doi: 10.1186/s12909-017-0953-9.

E-learning in graduate medical education: survey of residency program directors.

Author information

1
Division of General Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA. wittich.christopher@mayo.edu.
2
Departments of Medicine and Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.
3
Division of General Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA.
4
Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
5
Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
6
Department of Medicine, Memorial Healthcare System, Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA.
7
Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
8
Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

E-learning-the use of Internet technologies to enhance knowledge and performance-has become a widely accepted instructional approach. Little is known about the current use of e-learning in postgraduate medical education. To determine utilization of e-learning by United States internal medicine residency programs, program director (PD) perceptions of e-learning, and associations between e-learning use and residency program characteristics.

METHODS:

We conducted a national survey in collaboration with the Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine of all United States internal medicine residency programs.

RESULTS:

Of the 368 PDs, 214 (58.2%) completed the e-learning survey. Use of synchronous e-learning at least sometimes, somewhat often, or very often was reported by 85 (39.7%); 153 programs (71.5%) use asynchronous e-learning at least sometimes, somewhat often, or very often. Most programs (168; 79%) do not have a budget to integrate e-learning. Mean (SD) scores for the PD perceptions of e-learning ranged from 3.01 (0.94) to 3.86 (0.72) on a 5-point scale. The odds of synchronous e-learning use were higher in programs with a budget for its implementation (odds ratio, 3.0 [95% CI, 1.04-8.7]; P = .04).

CONCLUSIONS:

Residency programs could be better resourced to integrate e-learning technologies. Asynchronous e-learning was used more than synchronous, which may be to accommodate busy resident schedules and duty-hour restrictions. PD perceptions of e-learning are relatively moderate and future research should determine whether PD reluctance to adopt e-learning is based on unawareness of the evidence, perceptions that e-learning is expensive, or judgments about value versus effectiveness.

KEYWORDS:

Electronic learning; Graduate medical education; Medical education; Program directors; Residency training

PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center