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BMC Pediatr. 2017 Jul 11;17(1):160. doi: 10.1186/s12887-017-0907-8.

The role of family and school-level factors in bullying and cyberbullying: a cross-sectional study.

Author information

1
UCL Institute of Child Health, Population, Policy and Practice Programme, 30 Guilford Street, WC1N 1EH, London, UK. l.bevilacqua@ucl.ac.uk.
2
UCL Institute of Child Health, Population, Policy and Practice Programme - General and Adolescent Paediatrics Unit, 30 Guilford Street (1st Floor), WC1N 1EH, London, UK. l.bevilacqua@ucl.ac.uk.
3
The University of Auckland, COMPASS, Auckland, New Zealand.
4
UCL Institute of Child Health, Population, Policy and Practice Programme, 30 Guilford Street, WC1N 1EH, London, UK.
5
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Clinical Trials Unit, Keppel Street, WC1E 7HT, London, UK.
6
University of Glasgow, MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, Glasgow, UK.
7
UCL, Institute of Epidemiology & Health, 1-19 Torrington Place, London, WC1E 7HB -, London, UK.
8
Dpt. of Medical Statistics, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, London, UK.
9
Cardiff University, School of Social Sciences, Cardiff, UK.
10
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Faculty of Public Health and Policy, London, UK.
11
King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, London, UK.
12
UCL, Institute of Education, London, UK.
13
Department of Social and Environmental Health Research, Institute of Education, UCL, WC1H 9SH, London, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Bullying and cyberbullying are common phenomena in schools. These negative behaviours can have a significant impact on the health and particularly mental health of those involved in such behaviours, both as victims and as bullies. This UK study aims to investigate student-level and school-level characteristics of those who become involved in bullying and cyberbullying behaviours as victims or perpetrators.

METHODS:

We used data from 6667 Year 7 students from the baseline survey of a cluster randomized trial in 40 English schools to investigate the associations between individual-level and school-level variables with bullying victimization, cyberbullying perpetration, and cyberbullying victimization. We ran multilevel models to examine associations of bullying outcomes with individual-level variables and school-level variables.

RESULTS:

In multilevel models, at the school level, school type and school quality measures were associated with bullying risk: students in voluntary-aided schools were less likely to report bullying victimization (0.6 (0.4, 0.9) p = 0.008), and those in community (3.9 (1.5, 10.5) p = 0.007) and foundation (4.0 (1.6, 9.9) p = 0.003) schools were more likely to report being perpetrators of cyberbullying than students in mainstream academies. A school quality rating of "Good" was associated with greater reported bullying victimization (1.3 (1.02, 1.5) p = 0.03) compared to ratings of "Outstanding."

CONCLUSIONS:

Bullying victimization and cyberbullying prevalence vary across school type and school quality, supporting the hypothesis that organisational/management factors within the school may have an impact on students' behaviour. These findings will inform future longitudinal research investigating which school factors and processes promote or prevent bullying and cyberbullying behaviours.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

Trial ID: ISRCTN10751359 Registered: 11/03/2014 (retrospectively registered).

KEYWORDS:

Cyberbullying; Gatehouse bullying scale; Multi-level models; School-level variables; Student-level variables

PMID:
28697725
PMCID:
PMC5505024
DOI:
10.1186/s12887-017-0907-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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