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Behav Sci (Basel). 2017 Jul 11;7(3). pii: E44. doi: 10.3390/bs7030044.

Strategies to Improve Adherence to Dietary Weight Loss Interventions in Research and Real-World Settings.

Author information

1
The Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise & Eating Disorders, Sydney Medical School, Charles Perkins Centre, The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW 2006, Australia. alice.gibson@sydney.edu.au.
2
The Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise & Eating Disorders, Sydney Medical School, Charles Perkins Centre, The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW 2006, Australia. amanda.salis@sydney.edu.au.

Abstract

Dietary interventions are the cornerstone of obesity treatment. The optimal dietary approach to weight loss is a hotly debated topic among health professionals and the lay public alike. An emerging body of evidence suggests that a higher level of adherence to a diet, regardless of the type of diet, is an important factor in weight loss success over the short and long term. Key strategies to improve adherence include designing dietary weight loss interventions (such as ketogenic diets) that help to control the increased drive to eat that accompanies weight loss, tailoring dietary interventions to a person's dietary preferences (and nutritional requirements), and promoting self-monitoring of food intake. The aim of this paper is to examine these strategies, which can be used to improve adherence and thereby increase the success of dietary weight loss interventions.

KEYWORDS:

adherence; appetite; diet-reducing; obesity

PMID:
28696389
DOI:
10.3390/bs7030044
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Conflict of interest statement

A.A.G. has received payment for oral presentations from the Pharmacy Guild of Australia and Nestlé Health Sciences. A.S. has received payment from Eli Lilly, the Pharmacy Guild of Australia, Novo Nordisk, the Dietitians Association of Australia, Shoalhaven Family Medical Centres and the Pharmaceutical Society of Australia for seminar presentation at conferences, and has served on the Nestlé Health Science Optifast VLCD Advisory Board since 2016. She is also the author of The Don’t Go Hungry Diet (Bantam, Australia and New Zealand, 2007) and Don’t Go Hungry for Life (Bantam, Australia and New Zealand, 2011).

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