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Nat Commun. 2017 Jul 11;8:16035. doi: 10.1038/ncomms16035.

Innate scavenger receptor-A regulates adaptive T helper cell responses to pathogen infection.

Author information

1
Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory of Modern Pathogen Biology, Department of Pathogen Biology and Immunology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210029, China.
2
Atherosclerosis Research Center, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease and Molecular Intervention, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210029, China.

Abstract

The pattern recognition receptor (PRR) scavenger receptor class A (SR-A) has an important function in the pathogenesis of non-infectious diseases and in innate immune responses to pathogen infections. However, little is known about the role of SR-A in the host adaptive immune responses to pathogen infection. Here we show with mouse models of helminth Schistosoma japonicum infection and heat-inactivated Mycobacterium tuberculosis stimulation that SR-A is regulated by pathogens and suppresses IRF5 nuclear translocation by direct interaction. Reduced abundance of nuclear IRF5 shifts macrophage polarization from M1 towards M2, which subsequently switches T-helper responses from type 1 to type 2. Our study identifies a role for SR-A as an innate PRR in regulating adaptive immune responses.

PMID:
28695899
PMCID:
PMC5508227
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms16035
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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