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Plant Reprod. 2017 Sep;30(3):141-146. doi: 10.1007/s00497-017-0304-3. Epub 2017 Jul 10.

Molecular movement in the Arabidopsis thaliana female gametophyte.

Author information

1
Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, MA, 02142, USA.
2
Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 02139, USA.
3
Department of Plant Molecular Genetics, University of Bremen, 28359, Bremen, Germany.
4
Institute for Organic Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76131, Karlsruhe, Germany.
5
Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, MA, 02142, USA. mgehring@wi.mit.edu.
6
Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 02139, USA. mgehring@wi.mit.edu.

Abstract

Size limits on molecular movement among female gametes. Cellular decisions can be influenced by information communicated from neighboring cells. Communication can occur via signaling or through the direct transfer of molecules. Movement of RNAs and proteins has frequently been observed among symplastically connected plant cells. In flowering plants, the female gametes, the egg cell and central cell, are closely apposed within the female gametophyte. Here we investigated the ability of fluorescently labeled dyes and small RNAs to move from the Arabidopsis thaliana central cell to the egg apparatus following microinjection. These results define a size limit of at least 20 kDa for symplastic movement between the two gametes, somewhat larger than that previously observed in Torenia fournieri. Our results indicate that symplastic connectivity in Arabidopsis thaliana changes after fertilization and suggest that prior to fertilization mechanisms are in place to facilitate small RNA movement from the central cell to the egg cell and synergids.

KEYWORDS:

Arabidopsis thaliana; Central cell; Egg apparatus; Female gametophyte; Small RNAs; Symplastic movement

PMID:
28695277
PMCID:
PMC5599461
DOI:
10.1007/s00497-017-0304-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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