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Appl Microbiol Biotechnol. 2017 Sep;101(17):6793-6807. doi: 10.1007/s00253-017-8390-6. Epub 2017 Jul 10.

Application of the entomogenous fungus, Metarhizium anisopliae, for leafroller (Cnaphalocrocis medinalis) control and its effect on rice phyllosphere microbial diversity.

Hong M1,2,3, Peng G1,2,3, Keyhani NO1,4, Xia Y5,6,7.

Author information

1
Genetic Engineering Research Center, School of Life Sciences, Chongqing University, Chongqing, 400045, People's Republic of China.
2
Chongqing Engineering Research Center for Fungal Insecticide, Chongqing, 400045, People's Republic of China.
3
Key Laboratory of Gene Function and Regulation Technologies under Chongqing Municipal Education Commission, Chongqing, 400045, People's Republic of China.
4
Department of Microbiology and Cell Science, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 32611, USA.
5
Genetic Engineering Research Center, School of Life Sciences, Chongqing University, Chongqing, 400045, People's Republic of China. yuxianxia@cqu.edu.cn.
6
Chongqing Engineering Research Center for Fungal Insecticide, Chongqing, 400045, People's Republic of China. yuxianxia@cqu.edu.cn.
7
Key Laboratory of Gene Function and Regulation Technologies under Chongqing Municipal Education Commission, Chongqing, 400045, People's Republic of China. yuxianxia@cqu.edu.cn.

Abstract

Microbial pesticides form critical components of integrated pest management (IPM) practices. Little, however, is known regarding the impacts of these organisms on the indigenous microbial community. We show that Metarhizium anisopliae strain CQMa421 was highly effective in controlling the rice leafroller, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis Guenee. In addition, M. anisopliae distribution and its effects on phyllosphere microbial diversity after application in field trials were investigated. Phylloplane specific distribution of the fungus was observed over time, with more rapid declines of M. anisopliae CFUs (colony-forming units) seen in the top leaf layer as compared to lower layers. Application of the fungus resulted in transient changes in the endogenous microbial diversity with variations seen in the bacterial observed species and Shannon index. Notable increases in both parameters were seen at 6-day post-application of M. anisopliae, although significant variation within sample replicates for bacteria and fungi were noted. Application of M. anisopliae increased the relative distribution of bacterial species implicated in plant growth promotion and organic pollutant degradation, e.g., Methylobacterium, Sphingobium, and Deinococcus. These data show minimal impact of M. anisopliae on endogenous microbial diversity with transient changes in bacterial abundance/diversity that may result in added benefits to crops.

KEYWORDS:

Distribution; M. anisopliae; Microbial community; Microbial diversity; Phyllosphere

PMID:
28695229
DOI:
10.1007/s00253-017-8390-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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