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BMC Res Notes. 2017 Jul 11;10(1):272. doi: 10.1186/s13104-017-2596-7.

Medical student and medical school teaching faculty perceptions of conflict of interest.

Author information

1
University of Iowa, Carver College of Medicine, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA.
2
Department of Pathology, University of Iowa, Carver College of Medicine, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA. mkrasows@healthcare.uiowa.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Attitudes towards conflict of interest (COI) and COI policy are shaped during medical school and influence both the education of medical students and their future medical practice. Understanding the current attitudes of medical students and medical school teaching faculty may provide insight into what is taught about COI and COI policy within the 'hidden' medical curriculum. Differences between medical student and medical school teaching faculty perceptions of COI and COI policy have not been compared in detail. The authors surveyed first year medical students and medical school teaching faculty at one academic medical center.

RESULTS:

The response rate was 98.7% (150/152) for students and 34.2% (69/202) for faculty. Students were less likely than faculty to agree that lecturers should disclose COI to any learners (4.06 vs. 4.31, p = 0.01), but more likely to agree that COI disclosure decreases the presentation of biased material (3.80 vs. 3.21, p < 0.001). Student and faculty responses for all other questions were not different. Many of these responses suggest student and faculty support for stronger COI policy at academic medical centers.

CONCLUSIONS:

Students and faculty perceptions regarding COI and COI policy are largely similar, but differ in terms of the perceived effectiveness of COI disclosure. This study also suggests that medical students and medical school teaching faculty support for stronger COI policy at academic medical centers.

KEYWORDS:

Conflict of interest; Continuing medical education; Disclosure; Education and training; Medical education

PMID:
28693566
PMCID:
PMC5504664
DOI:
10.1186/s13104-017-2596-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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