Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Curr Opin Plant Biol. 2017 Oct;39:114-122. doi: 10.1016/j.pbi.2017.06.002. Epub 2017 Jul 7.

Nutrient scavenging and energy management: acclimation responses in nitrogen and sulfur deprived Chlamydomonas.

Author information

1
Department of Plant Biology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA 94305, United States.
2
Department of Plant Biology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA 94305, United States; Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-5020, United States.
3
Department of Plant Biology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA 94305, United States. Electronic address: arthurg@stanford.edu.

Abstract

Photosynthetic organisms have evolved to modulate their metabolism to accommodate the highly dynamic light and nutrient conditions in nature. In this review we discuss ways in which the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii acclimates to nitrogen and sulfur deprivation, conditions that would limit the anabolic use of excitation energy because of a markedly reduced capacity for cell growth and division. Major aspects of this acclimation process are stringently regulated and involve scavenging the limited nutrient from internal and external sources, and the redirection of fixed carbon toward energy storage (e.g. starch, oil). However, photosynthetic organisms have also evolved mechanisms to dissipate excess absorbed light energy, and to eliminate potentially dangerous energetic electrons through the reduction of O2 and H+ to H2O; this reduction can occur both through photosynthetic electron transport (e.g. Mehler reaction, chlororespiration) and mitochondrial respiration. Furthermore, algal cells likely exploit other energy management pathways that are currently not linked to nutrient limitation responses or that remain to be identified.

PMID:
28692856
DOI:
10.1016/j.pbi.2017.06.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center