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Dyslexia. 2017 Aug;23(3):296-315. doi: 10.1002/dys.1561. Epub 2017 Jul 10.

Exploring the Link between Visual Perception, Visual-Motor Integration, and Reading in Normal Developing and Impaired Children using DTVP-2.

Author information

1
University Paul-Valéry Montpellier, Epsylon Research Unit EA, 4556, Montpellier, France.
2
Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, LPL, Aix-en-Provence, France.
3
Aix Marseille Univ, PSYCLE, Aix-en-Provence, France.
4
Lyon Neuroscience Research Center (CRNL), Lyon 1 University, Lyon, France.

Abstract

Reading is known to be primarily a linguistic task. However, to successfully decode written words, children also need to develop good visual-perception skills. Furthermore, motor skills are implicated in letter recognition and reading acquisition. Three studies have been designed to determine the link between reading, visual perception, and visual-motor integration using the Developmental Test of Visual Perception version 2 (DTVP-2). Study 1 tests how visual perception and visual-motor integration in kindergarten predict reading outcomes in Grade 1, in typical developing children. Study 2 is aimed at finding out if these skills can be seen as clinical markers in dyslexic children (DD). Study 3 determines if visual-motor integration and motor-reduced visual perception can distinguish DD children according to whether they exhibit or not developmental coordination disorder (DCD). Results showed that phonological awareness and visual-motor integration predicted reading outcomes one year later. DTVP-2 demonstrated similarities and differences in visual-motor integration and motor-reduced visual perception between children with DD, DCD, and both of these deficits. DTVP-2 is a suitable tool to investigate links between visual perception, visual-motor integration and reading, and to differentiate cognitive profiles of children with developmental disabilities (i.e. DD, DCD, and comorbid children).

KEYWORDS:

comorbidity; developmental dyslexia; developmental-coordination disorder; reading; visual perception

PMID:
28691167
DOI:
10.1002/dys.1561
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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