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Med Eng Phys. 2017 Sep;47:25-37. doi: 10.1016/j.medengphy.2017.06.028. Epub 2017 Jul 6.

A FSI computational framework for vascular physiopathology: A novel flow-tissue multiscale strategy.

Author information

1
Department of Civil Engineering and Computer Science (DICII), Universitá degli Studi di Roma "Tor Vergata", Via del Politecnico 1, Rome 00133, Italy. Electronic address: d.bianchi@ing.uniroma2.it.
2
Department of Engineering, Universitá degli Studi "Niccoló Cusano" - Telematica, Roma, Via Don C. Gnocchi 3, Rome 00166, Italy.
3
Department of Engineering, Unit of Nonlinear Physics and Mathematical Modeling, University Campus Bio-Medico of Rome, Via A. del Portillo 21, Rome 00128, Italy.
4
Institute of Continuum Mechanics, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Appelstr. 11, Hannover 30167, Germany.
5
Department of Civil Engineering and Computer Science (DICII), Universitá degli Studi di Roma "Tor Vergata", Via del Politecnico 1, Rome 00133, Italy.

Abstract

A novel fluid-structure computational framework for vascular applications is herein presented. It is developed by combining the double multi-scale nature of vascular physiopathology in terms of both tissue properties and blood flow. Addressing arterial tissues, they are modelled via a nonlinear multiscale constitutive rationale, based only on parameters having a clear histological and biochemical meaning. Moreover, blood flow is described by coupling a three-dimensional fluid domain (undergoing physiological inflow conditions) with a zero-dimensional model, which allows to reproduce the influence of the downstream vasculature, furnishing a realistic description of the outflow proximal pressure. The fluid-structure interaction is managed through an explicit time-marching approach, able to accurately describe tissue nonlinearities within each computational step for the fluid problem. A case study associated to a patient-specific aortic abdominal aneurysmatic geometry is numerically investigated, highlighting advantages gained from the proposed multiscale strategy, as well as showing soundness and effectiveness of the established framework for assessing useful clinical quantities and risk indexes.

KEYWORDS:

Abdominal aortic aneurysm; Fluid-structure interaction; Hemodynamic risk indexes; Multiscale tissue mechanics; Nonlinear material modeling; Wall shear stress

PMID:
28690045
DOI:
10.1016/j.medengphy.2017.06.028
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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