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Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2018 Jan 3;80(Pt C):250-254. doi: 10.1016/j.pnpbp.2017.07.003. Epub 2017 Jul 6.

Interactions between pro-inflammatory cytokines and statins on depression in patients with acute coronary syndrome.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Cardiology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Republic of Korea.
3
IMPACT Strategic Research Centre, School of Medicine, Deakin University, Geelong, Australia; Department of Psychiatry, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia.
4
Department of Psychiatry, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: jmkim@chonnam.ac.kr.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Pro-inflammatory cytokines are associated with the development of depression and statins exert anti-inflammatory and antidepressant effects. The present study aimed to investigate associations between interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-18 and depression in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and potential interactions between statin use and pro-inflammatory cytokines on depression in this population.

METHODS:

We used pooled datasets from 1-year follow-up data from a 24-week randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial (RCT) of escitalopram for treatment of depressive disorder and data from a naturalistic, prospective, observational cohort study in patients with ACS. IL-6 and IL-18 levels were measured at baseline. Logistic regression models were used to investigate independent associations of IL-6/IL-18 levels with depressive disorder at baseline and at 1year. We repeated all analyses by reference to statin use to determine whether any significant association emerged.

RESULTS:

Of the 969 participants, 378 (39.0%) had major or minor depression at baseline. Of 711 patients followed-up at 1year, 183 (25.7%) had depression. Logistic regression analysis showed that higher IL-6 and IL-18 levels at baseline were significantly associated with baseline depression after adjusting for other variables (adjusted p-values=0.005 and 0.001, respectively). IL-6 and IL-18 levels were also significantly higher in patients with depression at the 1-year follow-up after adjusting for other variables amongst those not taking statins (adjusted p-values=0.040 and 0.004, respectively); but this was not the case in patients taking statins.

CONCLUSION:

Levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines appear to predict development of depression after ACS and statins attenuate the effects of cytokines on depression.

KEYWORDS:

Coronary syndrome; Cytokines; Depression; Interleukin-18; Interleukin-6; Statins

PMID:
28689006
DOI:
10.1016/j.pnpbp.2017.07.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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