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Infant Behav Dev. 2017 Nov;49:31-36. doi: 10.1016/j.infbeh.2017.05.002. Epub 2017 Jul 6.

The lowering of bilirubin levels in patients with neonatal jaundice using massage therapy: A randomized, double-blind clinical trial.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran. Electronic address: eghbalian_fa@yahoo.com.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran. Electronic address: Hhamidi50@gmail.com.
3
Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Due to the effects of massage on various laboratory parameters (including those related to jaundice) in infants and the expansion of existing studies to achieve effective and safe therapy in the treatment of neonatal jaundice, this study aimed to investigate the effect of massage on bilirubin levels in cases of neonatal jaundice.

METHODS:

In this study, 134 patients were randomly assigned to either an intervention group (massage combined with phototherapy, n=67) or a control group (phototherapy only, n=67). In both groups, serum total bilirubin level and frequency of daily bowel movements were measured and compared during each of the first four days of treatment.

RESULTS:

Baseline levels of bilirubin were similar between the two groups (P>0.05). During the measurements obtained post-intervention, significant differences surfaces between the two groups in bilirubin levels and frequency of daily bowel movements (P<0.05 for both). No significant relationship was observed during days 1 and 2 of massage therapy between daily frequency of bowel movements and serum bilirubin level (P>0.05); this relationship became significant during the third and fourth days (P<0.05).

CONCLUSION:

Massage therapy combined with phototherapy is an effective method for reducing serum total bilirubin in infants with neonatal jaundice.

KEYWORDS:

Billirubin; Massage therapy; Neonatal jaundice; Pediatrics; Phototherapy

PMID:
28688960
DOI:
10.1016/j.infbeh.2017.05.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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