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Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2017 Aug;99:111-116. doi: 10.1016/j.ijporl.2017.05.015. Epub 2017 May 25.

Pediatric invasive fungal rhinosinusitis: An investigation of 17 patients.

Author information

1
Baylor College of Medicine Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Houston, TX, USA. Electronic address: daniel.vinh@bcm.edu.
2
Baylor College of Medicine Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Houston, TX, USA.
3
Baylor College of Medicine Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Houston, TX, USA; Texas Children's Hospital Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Houston, TX, USA.
4
Texas Children's Hospital Department of Statistics, Houston, TX, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To investigate outcomes of pediatric patients at a single institution with invasive fungal rhinosinusitis (IFRS) and to determine variables that impact overall survival.

METHODS:

All pediatric patients at a large tertiary children's hospital diagnosed with IFRS confirmed by surgical pathology from 2009 to 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Demographics, underlying diseases, symptoms, antifungal therapy, absolute neutrophil count (ANC), surgical management,and outcomes were analyzed.

RESULTS:

Seventeen patients were identified with IFRS with an average age of 8.7 years and 53% male. Hematologic malignancy was the most common (n = 13) underlying disease. The most common presenting symptoms were fever (82%) and congestion (41%). 15 patients had severe neutropenia (Absolute Neutrophil Count (ANC) < 500) within 2 weeks prior to diagnosis. The average ANC at time of diagnosis was 1420 cells/uL. 16 patients were treated with serial nasal endoscopy and debridement, while 1 patient was treated with an open approach. 16 received combination antifungals while 1 was treated with amphotericin monotherapy. The most common genus cultured was Fusarium (n = 6). The average number of surgical interventions was 3.4, with the average interval between interventions 6.2 days. 13 of 17 (76%) were cleared of IFRS. Overall survival at 6 months was 41%.

CONCLUSION:

Pediatric IFRS is a life-threatening disease that requires a coordinated surgical and medical approach. Despite a relatively high local control rate, overall mortality remains disappointingly high, reflecting the disease's underlying pathogenesis - lack of host defense and risk of disseminated fungal infection. Further investigation is necessary to reveal optimal management with regards to antifungal therapy, surgery, and utility of labs.

KEYWORDS:

Fungal; IFRS; Invasive; Pediatric; Rhinosinusitis; Sinusitis

PMID:
28688551
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijporl.2017.05.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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