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Nat Commun. 2017 Jul 7;8:16011. doi: 10.1038/ncomms16011.

Immobility responses are induced by photoactivation of single glomerular species responsive to fox odour TMT.

Author information

1
Department of Brain Function, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Matsuoka, Fukui 910-1193, Japan.
2
Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032, Japan.
3
Department of Physiology, Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan.
4
Genetic Engineering Team, RIKEN, Center for Life Science Technologies, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047, Japan.
5
Animal Resource Development Unit, RIKEN, Center for Life Science Technologies, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047, Japan.
6
Image Processing Research Team, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan.
7
Department of Animal Science and Biotechnology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Azabu University, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5201, Japan.

Abstract

Fox odour 2,4,5-trimethyl thiazoline (TMT) is known to activate multiple glomeruli in the mouse olfactory bulb (OB) and elicits strong fear responses. In this study, we screened TMT-reactive odourant receptors and identified Olfr1019 with high ligand reactivity and selectivity, whose glomeruli are located in the posterodorsal OB. In the channelrhodopsin knock-in mice for Olfr1019, TMT-responsive olfactory-cortical regions were activated by photostimulation, leading to the induction of immobility, but not aversive behaviour. Distribution of photoactivation signals was overlapped with that of TMT-induced signals, but restricted to the narrower regions. In the knockout mice, immobility responses were reduced, but not entirely abolished likely due to the compensatory function of other TMT-responsive glomeruli. Our results demonstrate that the activation of a single glomerular species in the posterodorsal OB is sufficient to elicit immobility responses and that TMT-induced fear may be separated into at least two different components of immobility and aversion.

PMID:
28685774
PMCID:
PMC5504302
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms16011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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