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Sci Rep. 2017 Jul 6;7(1):4826. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-05278-0.

Fish oil-enriched nutrition combined with systemic chemotherapy for gastrointestinal cancer patients with cancer cachexia.

Author information

1
Department of Nutrition, Iga City General Hospital, Mie, Japan.
2
Department of Surgery, Iga City General Hospital, Mie, Japan. yoshinaga.okugawa@gmail.com.
3
Department of Medical Oncology, Iga City General Hospital, Mie, Japan. yoshinaga.okugawa@gmail.com.
4
Department of Gastrointestinal and Pediatric Surgery, Division of Reparative Medicine, Institute of Life Sciences, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Mie, Japan. yoshinaga.okugawa@gmail.com.
5
Center for Gastrointestinal Research, Center for Translational Genomics and Oncology, Baylor Scott & White Research Institute and Charles A. Sammons Cancer Center, Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA. yoshinaga.okugawa@gmail.com.
6
Department of Preventive Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan.
7
Department of Nursing, Iga City General Hospital, Mie, Japan.
8
Department of Surgery, Iga City General Hospital, Mie, Japan.
9
Department of Gastrointestinal and Pediatric Surgery, Division of Reparative Medicine, Institute of Life Sciences, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Mie, Japan.
10
Department of Medical Oncology, Iga City General Hospital, Mie, Japan.
11
Center for Gastrointestinal Research, Center for Translational Genomics and Oncology, Baylor Scott & White Research Institute and Charles A. Sammons Cancer Center, Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA.
12
Academic Unit of Surgery, School of Medicine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK.
13
Department of Surgery, Iga City General Hospital, Mie, Japan. harborne3030@gmail.com.

Abstract

Despite recent advances in chemotherapy for gastrointestinal cancer, a crucial factor related to poor prognosis is reduced tolerance to chemotherapy induced by cancer cachexia. Fish oil (FO)-derived eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) modulates inflammation in patients with various malignancies; however, the impact of FO-enriched nutrition as a combined modality therapy on clinical outcomes remains controversial. We systemically analysed chronological changes in biochemical and physiological status using bioelectrical impedance analysis in 128 gastrointestinal cancer patients provided with or without FO-enriched nutrition during chemotherapy. Furthermore, we evaluated the clinical significance of FO-enriched nutrition and clarified appropriate patient groups that receive prognostic benefits from FO-enriched nutrition during treatment of gastrointestinal cancer. The control group showed significant up-regulation of serum CRP) levels and no significant difference in both skeletal muscle mass and lean body mass. In contrast, the FO-enriched nutrition group showed no changes in serum CRP concentration and significantly increased skeletal muscle mass and lean body mass over time. Furthermore, high CRP levels significantly correlated with reduced tolerance to chemotherapy, and FO-enriched nutrition improved chemotherapy tolerance and prognosis, particularly in gastrointestinal cancer patients with a modified Glasgow prognostic score (mGPS) of 1 or 2. We conclude that FO-enriched nutrition may improve the prognosis of patients with cancer cachexia and systemic inflammation (i.e., those with a mGPS of 1 or 2).

PMID:
28684736
PMCID:
PMC5500468
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-017-05278-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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